F800GS Tyre FAQ - BMW F800 Riders Forum & Registry



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  1. F800GS Tyre FAQ

    17 Comments by twisticles Published on 07-28-08 10:05 AM
    Wheel Specs:
    Rim, front 2.15 x 21"
    Rim, rear 4.25 x 17"
    Tyres, front 90/90 - 21 54V
    Tyres, rear 150/70 - 17 69V


    BMW Recommended Tyres:

    Road Bias:
    Front: Michelin Anakee, 90/90-21 M/C TL/TT (54V)
    Rear: Michelin Anakee C, 150/70 R17 M/C TL/TT (69V)



    Front: Bridgetstone Battlewing 501 G, 90/90-21 M/C TL/TT (54V) COMES AS STOCK
    Rear: Bridgestone Battlewing 502 G, 150/70 R17 M/C TL/TT (69V) COMES AS STOCK



    Off-Road Bias:
    Front: Metzler Karoo (T) Front, 90/90-21 M/C TL (54Q)* M+S
    Rear: Metzler KAroo (T), 150/70 -17 M/C TL (69Q)* M+S



    Front: Continental Twinduro TKC80, 90/90-21 M/C TL (54Q)* (Not manufacturered yet, go for the 90/90 54T model at present)
    Rear: Continental Twinduro TKC80, 150/70 B17 M/C TL (69Q)*



    * These tyres are rated Q (160km/h or 99mp/h) instead of V but can be used if "the permissable top speed is indicated by readily visible means (e.g. sticker affixed in the rider's field of vision)".



    Tyres not mentioned by BMW:

    The load index & size matches with slightly reduced speed rating are:
    Front: Pireli Scorpion MT90 A/T 90/90 -21 TL 54V M/C
    Rear: Pirelli Scorpion MT 90 S/T 150/70 R17 TL 69H



    Front: Avon Distanzia AM43 90/90 -21 TL 54T
    Rear: Avon Distanzia AM 44 150/70 R17 TL 69V



    Front; Metzeler Tourance 90/90 -21 TL 54H M/C
    Rear: Metzeler Tourance 150/70 R17 TL 69V



    Front: Heidenau K60 90/90 -21 TL 54T M/C
    Rear: Heidenau K76 150/70 B17 TL 69H M/C





    FAQ:

    What pressures should I run my tyres at?

    For stock tyres:
    FRONT one-up: 2.2bar/32psi at 20 degrees celcius
    FRONT two-up and/or with luggage: 2.5bar/36psi at 20 degrees celcius
    REAR one-up: 2.5bar/36psi at 20 degrees celcius
    REAR two-up and/or with luggage: 2.9bar/42psi at 20 degrees celcius

    A quick internet search will throw up correct pressures for alternative tyres. 2.2front/2.5rear seems to be common. On the road I quite liked 2.5front/2.9rear only one-up on the stock Battlewings.

    Can I use Tubeless Tyres on the 800GS?
    Yes, Tubeless tyres (TL) are fine. So are tube-type (TT) tyres. See Chart above. But either way you will still need a tube (see rim sizes above).
    That's because the wheels have spokes and air will leak out if you don't have a tube. The 1200GS has special spoke that go to the side of the wheel so their owners can use tubeless tyres - you can't on your 800GS.

    Do I need Rim Locks?
    Probably not, unless you're planning to do the Paris-Dakar on the 800GS in which case you should know a lot more about tyres and tubes already.

    How do I check pressures at 20 degrees celcius?
    Set the climate control in your garage to 20 degrees celcius and only ever check your pressure in there.
    OR...bear in mind that a change of 10 degrees celcius is equivalent to a change of about 0.07bars or 1psi. So on a near freezing day increase pressure by about 0.14bars/2psi or on a very hot Death Valley kind of day reduce pressure by 0.14bars/2psi. This applies to 'cold' tyres that haven't been ridden on recently, I have no idea how hot your tyres will be after a few trails.

    Should I reduce pressures when off-roading?
    If you're going on sand, gravel or very gloopy mud you can maybe lose 5psi/0.4bars but much less and you risk 'tyre slip' where the wheel spins but the tyre doesn't. This will result in the tube valve being ripped out and sudden deflation. You could deflate more and use rim locks (see above).
    Put it this way: the BMW Off-Road schools runs their 800GSs off road at road pressures. 'nuff said.


    If I want to repair a puncture out in the woods, what tools will I need?
    • 22mm socket for front axel
    • 24mm socket for rear axel
    • a wrench for the sockets
    • Torx keys for M8 and M10 torx bolts (front axel clamps and front brake calliper)
    • Tork key for the ABS sensor if you are clumsy and might knock it when removing/replacing wheel
    • A centre stand (or lie the bike down)
    • A large rock/block to go under the engine when you want to remove the front wheel on the centre stand (or lie the bike down)
    • Tyre levers (two or three, depends how good you are)
    • Rim protectors or bits of plastic bottle (so you don't scratch the rims, depends how precious about your bike you are)
    • A bead breaker (or thick heavy boot heal)
    • Some 4"X4" or something to rest the wheel rim on while you break the bead with your boot, or you will knacker the sprocket/brake discs. Or you can dig a hole in the dirt.
    • Valve removal tool (to take the valve out of the valve stem to deflate the tube enough to get it out)
    • A little spanner (wrench) to remove the lock nut on the valve stem
    • A puncture repair kit (patches/glue) or a spare tube
    • A inflation device (CO2 cartridges, electric compressor or hand pump)
    • Some prior knowledge of how to repair a puncture. Best to practice at home before you need to do it for real.

    Good grief thats a lot of stuff for a puncture? Isn't there any easier way?
    Yeah. Push bike to nearest road. Phone BMW assist.

    Har Har. Can't I just plug the tyre?
    No, its got a tube, remember? Should have bought the 650GS.

    What about tyre sealant? Can I use that?
    Bit late once you have a puncture. There are special formula sealants for tubed tyres. Messy stuff though, and it won't work on gashes or big punctures, but it will gloop everything up and make the tube irrepairable. Also, a small nail in the tyre can cause a large rip in the tube as the tube 'squirms' inside the tyre at speed.

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  3. Total Comments 17

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  4. #2
    twisticles's Avatar
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    I just noticed...the picture above of the Karoo is the very off-road version. The Karoo "T" (Traveller?) version is a little more like the TKC80 and more friendly on tarmac.

  5. #3
    twisticles's Avatar
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    OK, I got my Heidenaus confused.

    There are two Heidenau options for the 800GS:

    Off-Road
    Heidenau 150/70 B17 M/C 69T TL K60 REAR
    Heidenau 90/90 - 21 M/C TL 54H K 60 FRONT

    TKC80 style tyre


    Road Bias
    Heidenau 150/70 - 17 M/C TL 69H K 76 REAR
    Heidenau 90/90 - 21 M/C TL 54H K 76 FRONT

    Tourance - style tyre

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  7. #4
    10Cup is offline F800Riders.org Supporter
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    Curious, with the popularity of the Metz Tourance wonder why BMW does not recommend? Any idea?

    TIA
    Mike

  8. #5
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    My guess is that BMW is not being paid to recommend the Tourance. I used them on my F650 Funduro and loved them. They stick well and last a long time. Just don't take them off road. They aren't much better than regular street tires. I figure that if the "shoe fits" then wear it.

  9. #6
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    Metzeler does not produce (yet?) Tourance front tyres with speed code V, i.e. it is not legal to have them on the f800gs - at least in most European countries...

  10. #7
    twisticles's Avatar
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    Thanks to Shag over on another site, it seems that the Conti Trail Attack is now available in 800GS sizes:

    Front : 90/90 - 21 M/C 54 H TL
    Rear: 150/70 R 17 M/C 69 V TL

    Both tyres at 2.5 bar or 36 psi

  11. #8
    pedantic_pete's Avatar
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    You mention above that you can't repair an inner tube if it's been glooped up with tyre sealant. My dealer told me the inner tubes aren't repairable. Is that true?

    Just had a rear puncture today. None of my local dealers had an inner tube in stock for goodness sake! I've had to leave the bike with one of them to repair when the ordered tube comes in.

    I'm heading off to mail order as soon as I get the details of the inner tubes required (can you help there?) so I can carry them on the bike in future.

  12. #9

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    Great post and very appreciated!

    Any follow up information on tubes? I would like to grab a front and rear just in case they are needed. I would hate to run into a situation like pedantic_pete did and have to wait for an order or get stuck on the side without any way of getting them replaced in short order.

    Robert

  13. #10

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    I have an F800GS with stock Battlewing tyres. I do most of my riding on some sort of road. I do however find myself sometimes going along gravelly and muddy paths while out in the countryside or going long distance and find it a struggle with the said tyres, even thoiugh I am a pretty confident off road rider.

    So I am looking for tyres that will still be good on road (in the wet too), but will do a little better than the battelwings when I go off road occasionally.

    Basically, I'm happy to give up some of the excellent on-road capabilty the BWs have, in exchange for some improvement in off road manners.

    Correct me if I'm wrong but it comes down to either the Karoos or the TKC80s. Is that right, or are there others I can consider too. I like the Saharas but they don't come in the rifht size.

    Any feedback/advice will be most appreciated.

    Especially if you think Karoos or the TKCs will be very risky on wet tarmac.

  14. #11
    pedantic_pete's Avatar
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    Can anyone comment on the compatibility of mixing Metzeler and Bridgestone tyres on the 800GS? My new GS came fitted with Metzelers, but I preferred Bridgestone Battlewings on my previous GS. My front now needs replacing after 6000 miles, but the rear is still good for some time to come. Can I put a Bridgestone on the front and keep the Metzeler on the rear until that wears out?
    [COLOR=Red]2013 F800GS Cordoba blue/black, ABS, ASC, ESA, heated grips, centrestand, BMW vario cases, Scottoiler, Touratech hand protectors, Powerbronze flip-up screen Number of ABS extended releases: None 

  15. #12

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    Hi Saint...I see your post is from 2010, what tyres did you eventually go with? I'm in the same predicament now, and considering the Karoo 3. The TKC80'S didnt do well for me on the tar, great on dirt though.

  16. #13

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    Hi Pete...im quite sure you can mix the tyre types. Shouldn't be a problem at all as I've seen a lot of bikes with mixed brands.

  17. #14

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    Thanks a lot..

  18. #15

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    I am also between TKC 80s and Karoo 3s.. I do most of my riding on tarmac, but will start to get on dirt now more often.. I don't want the new tires to be too slippery on wet asphalt, but also like to be confident offroad.. What are your suggestions??

  19. #16

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    I went with the Karoo 3's and I'm very very happy. Great grip on the tar and good on the dirt. The soft compound is better than expected, although they will wear quicker than other types.

  20. #17
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    My front axle nut is 17mm, not 22mm. Are there different versions out there?

    [QUOTE=twisticles;354855]Wheel Specs:

    If I want to repair a puncture out in the woods, what tools will I need?
    • 22mm socket for front axel
    • 24mm socket for rear axel
    • a wrench for the sockets
    • Torx keys for M8 and M10 torx bolts (front axel clamps and front brake calliper)
    • Tork key for the ABS sensor if you are clumsy and might knock it when removing/replacing wheel
    • A centre stand (or lie the bike down)
    • A large rock/block to go under the engine when you want to remove the front wheel on the centre stand (or lie the bike down)
    • Tyre levers (two or three, depends how good you are)
    • Rim protectors or bits of plastic bottle (so you don't scratch the rims, depends how precious about your bike you are)
    • A bead breaker (or thick heavy boot heal)
    • Some 4"X4" or something to rest the wheel rim on while you break the bead with your boot, or you will knacker the sprocket/brake discs. Or you can dig a hole in the dirt.
    • Valve removal tool (to take the valve out of the valve stem to deflate the tube enough to get it out)
    • A little spanner (wrench) to remove the lock nut on the valve stem
    • A puncture repair kit (patches/glue) or a spare tube
    • A inflation device (CO2 cartridges, electric compressor or hand pump)
    • Some prior knowledge of how to repair a puncture. Best to practice at home before you need to do it for real.
    Last edited by staggart; 09-01-16 at 01:32 PM. Reason: title seems lost

  21. #18
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    Now if you had a Vincent Rapide the mudguards have stands built into them and either wheel can be removed without using a spanner, (they are held in with tommy-bars and brake stays have spring held hand operated 'keyhole' clips). So all you need is a couple of tyre levers, a bicycle inner tube puncture repair kit, some water to check where the hole is in the inner tube, and a bicycle pump.

    But then my Rapide I sold for £110 would cost you around £50,000 to-day so perhaps it isn't a practical solution.

    Ps I see you forgot a tyre pressure gauge!

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