TPMS DIY Battery replacement - BMW F800 Riders Forum & Registry



Remove this advertisement by REGISTERING.

Results 1 to 20 of 20
  1. #1
    redhededgreg's Avatar
    Points: 16,787, Level: 89

    Real Name
    Greg
    Location
    Portland OR
    Joined
    Mar 2008
    Online
    09-12-19
    Posts
    426 / 1 / 101 / 82
    Motorcycle
    '09 R1200RT
    Motorcycle
    '08 F800ST
    Sorry not to provide any pictures on this procedure.
    About a week ago, both front and rear tire pressure readings showed -- with an accompanying triangle next to the display as well as the larger triangle warning light on the instrument panel. At various times over the past 6 months or so, either tire pressure reading was slow to display. Since my 2008 ST had never had the TPMS batteries replaced, my assumption was that the lag time in the display earlier was an indication that the batteries were failing. I also assumed that to be the case when the display on both wheels failed to register and generated the warning lights. I have a GS-911 which showed error codes for the TPMS when I hooked it up. I cleared the codes, checked tire inflation and went for a ride. No reading again for either tire and the warning triangles returned. I again assumed the batteries were toast as 10 years seems like a reasonable life span.
    I did rear tire first:
    1. Remove rear wheel (you must loosen the muffler clamp and remove the bolt from the muffler hanger bracket and swing the muffler away from the wheel in order to get the wheel and tire free-bike is on the center stand)
    2. Break bead and free one side of tire from the rim. Not necessary to completely remove tire. With one side of the bead outside the rim you can move the remaining bead in order to access the TPM module. (After using a number of other manual methods, I can recommend the Harbor Freight bead breaker. Works great and easy to store back in original box.) Plenty of Youtubes out there for tire removal.
    3. The TPM module is attached to the inner rim with a single Torx bolt, I think a T40 IIRC.
    4. I followed this YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mpjz0cDjnK4 exactly to do my replacement.
    5. Front tire same procedure. Of course brake calipers must be displaced and it helps to remove front fender to get wheel and tire out. I raise front wheel by placing blocks under engine case while assistant raises front by pressing down on luggage rack.

    Tricky parts of procedure:
    • removing old battery takes care and patience. After you scrape off the epoxy (or whatever that black stuff is) disconnecting the top terminal from the old battery can be difficult as it appears to have been soldered. Also, take care with tire irons not to damage sensor when removing tire.
    • as shown in the YouTube, do your best to get a positive connection between the top contact and the new battery by bending the contact down before putting the battery in and, again, as shown in the video, it may help to hold the contact down onto the battery when applying the hot glue. That's what I did.
    • no way I know of that you can test your success except by remounting tires, going for a ride and carefully keeping the first 2 digits on your throttle hand crossed.
    • my experience was as the video presenter, I rode initially with no indication I was successful. I stopped, turned ignition off, restarted and rode again, same result-no joy. Stopped once again, ignition off, waited briefly, started back up. The third time, the warning triangles were gone and both TP displays came up after a short distance. SUCCESS!

    I suspect the dealer resolution to this is replacing both modules at nearly $200 each plus labor.

    Definitely a job worth taking on!.
    Last edited by redhededgreg; 01-01-18 at 10:35 PM. Reason: ADD info
    "The reason i do it is because if you get it wrong it'll kill you. If you think it's too dangerous then go home and cut your grass and leave us to it." Guy Martin
    '08 F800ST w/ Remus and HID, '09 R1200RT w/HID+Clearwaters, '11 R1200GS Denali equipped. 

  2. ThanksDaboo, Willy, IanA, nkaj thanked for this post
  3. Remove Advertisements
    F800Riders.org
    Advertisements
     

  4. #2
    Daboo's Avatar
    Points: 44,112, Level: 100

    Real Name
    Chris
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Joined
    Jun 2014
    Online
    6 Hours Ago
    Posts
    4,205 / 0 / 9 / 3
    Motorcycle
    '14 F800 GT
    Thanks, Greg! This is good stuff!! It'll be good info for anyone with TPMS.

    Chris
    Elnathan - 2014 BMW F800GT
    IBA# 49894 True Rounder = 0-20's - Rounder -- to -- 100's+ Red Hot Rounder

    John 14:6 

  5. #3
    Runmyownlife's Avatar
    Points: 13,895, Level: 81

    Real Name
    Andrew
    Location
    Calgary, Alberta
    Joined
    Feb 2017
    Online
    6 Hours Ago
    Posts
    942 / 0 / 0 / 0
    Motorcycle
    '08 F800 ST
    Motorcycle
    '08 F800 ST
    I can confirm most of this tutorial. The black epoxy ultimately defeated me. The product must have flowed around and under the battery; it was impossible to remove. So, $500 to the dealer.
    Concrete remains undefeated. 

  6. Remove Advertisements
    F800Riders.org
    Advertisements
     

  7. #4
    redhededgreg's Avatar
    Points: 16,787, Level: 89

    Real Name
    Greg
    Location
    Portland OR
    Joined
    Mar 2008
    Online
    09-12-19
    Posts
    426 / 1 / 101 / 82
    Motorcycle
    '09 R1200RT
    Motorcycle
    '08 F800ST
    I did find one photo i took. Shows the position of the sensor on the rear wheel. IIRC the sensor on the front wheel is slightly more towards the center of the rim. The sensors are located near the valve stems on the rim and, unless yours have been removed, there should be a sticker on the outside of the rim near the valve stem, "sensor" marking their approximate location.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_0903.jpg 
Views:	298 
Size:	90.1 KB 
ID:	298297

    In the photo you can see the single Torx bolt holding it in place and that the sensor is accessible without entirely removing the tire.
    "The reason i do it is because if you get it wrong it'll kill you. If you think it's too dangerous then go home and cut your grass and leave us to it." Guy Martin
    '08 F800ST w/ Remus and HID, '09 R1200RT w/HID+Clearwaters, '11 R1200GS Denali equipped. 

  8. #5
    notacop is offline The original Schwartz Wald Troll
    Points: 49,088, Level: 100

    Location
    SoCalif. near Pasadena
    Joined
    Sep 2007
    Online
    7 Hours Ago
    Posts
    13,278 / 8 / 110 / 2177
    Motorcycle
    '08 F800 ST
    Motorcycle
    '04 DL-650A V-Strom
    Motorcycle
    '13 G650GS (Single)
    What's even better is that I found the Sunbeam Lithium 2023 batteries at the 99 Cents Only store for...99 cents for a 3 pack.
    The package does have a 3 year shelf life indication, made 2015, best by 2018.
    It is really unconscionable the the dealer, BMW, want to charge near $200 plus labor to replace a 30 cent battery.
    To manufacture a product deemed not user friendly is just he height of greed.
    But, hey, it's what make the world great, eh?

  9. #6
    N4HHE's Avatar
    Points: 16,992, Level: 90

    Real Name
    David Kelly
    Location
    Madison, AL
    Joined
    Feb 2010
    Online
    7 Hours Ago
    Posts
    1,813 / 18 / 47 / 424
    Motorcycle
    '16 FJR1300A
    Motorcycle
    '09 FE450
    Motorcycle
    '07 F800S
    With a bt of searching one should be able to find lithium batteries with the proper tabs welded on. Then unsolder old from the board and solder new in. Soldering directly to lithuin cell can destroy. I don’t have a high level of trust in the glued electrical connection shown in video.

    On dirt bikes we used a Watchdog enduro computer with similar potted lithium battery. When mine died I cut it out and soldered a CR2032 holder in its place. The original battery was larger and lasted several years but the CR2032 was much cheaper and easier to replace every 6 months. A real, spring loaded socket might fit and make better connection than what is shown. I’d look at DigiKey and/or Mouser Electronics. But make sure in advance you know exactly which cell fits yours.
    2016 Yamaha FJR1300A; 2016 Beta 430RS; 2007 BMW F800S; 2009 Husaberg FE450; 2016 Subaru Outback; 2018 F150; 2013 Tesla Model S 85; 1983 Porsche 928S; 9 cats 

  10. LikesMokkybear liked this post
  11. #7
    Points: 1, Level: 13

    Real Name
    Dennis
    Location
    Calgary
    Joined
    Sep 2017
    Online
    05-08-18
    Posts
    61 / 0 / 0 / 0
    If you have the proper soldering iron soldering this is really easy, I fly and build model airplanes and have such a iron, you need real high heat and some electric resin, it solders in a fraction of a second. If you don't have such a iron find some one that fixes electronics they will do it for you.

  12. Likesnotacop liked this post
  13. #8
    notacop is offline The original Schwartz Wald Troll
    Points: 49,088, Level: 100

    Location
    SoCalif. near Pasadena
    Joined
    Sep 2007
    Online
    7 Hours Ago
    Posts
    13,278 / 8 / 110 / 2177
    Motorcycle
    '08 F800 ST
    Motorcycle
    '04 DL-650A V-Strom
    Motorcycle
    '13 G650GS (Single)
    Nice to know you have a device that works, maybe telling the rest of us what make and model works such magic will get you a gold star on your collar.
    Don't worry, I'll gladly kill myself once the secret is revealed.

  14. #9
    Points: 1, Level: 13

    Real Name
    Dennis
    Location
    Calgary
    Joined
    Sep 2017
    Online
    05-08-18
    Posts
    61 / 0 / 0 / 0
    There are several models out there that will work Weller makes a good one, the one I use is a Hako FX-888D They are not really expensive around $120.00 Canadian. It is a good tool to have in your work shop. No need to do your self in ha ha.

  15. #10
    tvbilld's Avatar
    Points: 5,946, Level: 52

    Real Name
    Bill Darter
    Location
    Springfield Missouri
    Joined
    Nov 2012
    Online
    8 Hours Ago
    Posts
    116 / 0 / 0 / 13
    Motorcycle
    '08 F800 ST
    Quote Originally Posted by cygnet View Post
    There are several models out there that will work Weller makes a good one, the one I use is a Hako FX-888D They are not really expensive around $120.00 Canadian. It is a good tool to have in your work shop. No need to do your self in ha ha.
    With all the TV repair shops going out of business over the last few years probably find a good used soldering station.

  16. #11
    Mokkybear's Avatar
    Points: 46,283, Level: 100

    Real Name
    Mark H
    Location
    Canberra ACT AUS
    Joined
    Jun 2008
    Online
    5 Days Ago
    Posts
    2,397 / 5 / 154 / 637
    Motorcycle
    '07 F800ST
    Quote Originally Posted by N4HHE View Post
    With a bt of searching one should be able to find lithium batteries with the proper tabs welded on. Then unsolder old from the board and solder new in. Soldering directly to lithuin cell can destroy. I don’t have a high level of trust in the glued electrical connection shown in video. On dirt bikes we used a Watchdog enduro computer with similar potted lithium battery. When mine died I cut it out and soldered a CR2032 holder in its place. The original battery was larger and lasted several years but the CR2032 was much cheaper and easier to replace every 6 months. A real, spring loaded socket might fit and make better connection than what is shown. I’d look at DigiKey and/or Mouser Electronics. But make sure in advance you know exactly which cell fits yours.
    I’d be tempted to dig the potting material out a bit wider and use a battery with tabs - soldered in place to either the circuit board or residual tabs. The tabs are spot welded to the casings prior to assembly and my preference would not be to heat the battery. There’s a risk of internally damaging the battery and hamfistedness could cause the battery to explode. Exploding lithium batteries are not nice ...
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Battery.jpg 
Views:	127 
Size:	36.9 KB 
ID:	299497  
    Last edited by Mokkybear; 01-06-18 at 06:19 AM.
    R1200R-LC ​Exclusive in Thunder Grey with Touring Pack. Formerly Graphitane F800ST 04/2007. I rarely visit the forum these days ... 

  17. LikesN4HHE, Sundog52 liked this post
  18. #12
    Points: 2,287, Level: 30

    Location
    Northern Virginia
    Joined
    Feb 2017
    Online
    03-11-20
    Posts
    7 / 0 / 0 / 0
    I did a post about a year ago on installing a Chinese-sourced TPMS. I described my experience in installing and syncing a sensor I bought from a Chinese ebay seller, which cost me about $30 at the time.

    My Chinese sourced sensor is still working well. I actually think it is a real Schraeder sensor that may be old stock (and thus, old battery). It did not come with the decal or paperwork indicating what the sensor's code was. So I had to take a few extra steps using my GS-911 tool and a wake up tool to enable the bike to "learn" the code of the new sensor.

    So comparing these two methods (battery swap, versus Chinese sourced sensor), here are advantages/disadvantages.

    Of course, digging the old battery out of a sensor is fiddly and a bit time consuming. You also have the issue of the connection (solder or just use contact and hope for the best). It also helps if you are demounting the tire yourself, since you'd probably have to make two trips if you're having a shop deal with the tire. You'll need a hot glue gun and as some posters suggest, a soldering tool might be advisable.

    Main advantages are that its cheaper, and you know you have a fresh battery. And the bike already "knows" the code of the unit you are repairing.

    In contrast, the Chinese sourced TPMS should be ready to install. Issues are, first, you don't know how old the unit (and the battery) might be. You also need a GS-911 tool and some sort of gizmo to wake the sensor up and allow the bike to "learn" the code of the new sensor. And you have to be careful to order the correct sensor. The part numbers and applications on the ebay sites are not accurate. You need to go with the photograph. I think I describe all this in my earlier posts.

    Since I now have the tools and understand the process, I would opt for the Chinese sourced sensor again. But it turned out to be a bit more complex and expensive than I expected, at least for the first time through.

  19. #13
    Points: 1, Level: 13

    Real Name
    Dennis
    Location
    Calgary
    Joined
    Sep 2017
    Online
    05-08-18
    Posts
    61 / 0 / 0 / 0
    Quote Originally Posted by Mokkybear View Post
    I’d be tempted to dig the potting material out a bit wider and use a battery with tabs - soldered in place to either the circuit board or residual tabs. The tabs are spot welded to the casings prior to assembly and my preference would not be to heat the battery. There’s a risk of internally damaging the battery and hamfistedness could cause the battery to explode. Exploding lithium batteries are not nice ...
    To get that battery to explode I think you have to put it in a fire, and even then a 3 volt battery is not going to make a very big bang. But if you can find CR2032's with welded tabs go for it as for heat damaging the battery how hot do you think it gets when it's welded? Just my .02

  20. #14
    N4HHE's Avatar
    Points: 16,992, Level: 90

    Real Name
    David Kelly
    Location
    Madison, AL
    Joined
    Feb 2010
    Online
    7 Hours Ago
    Posts
    1,813 / 18 / 47 / 424
    Motorcycle
    '16 FJR1300A
    Motorcycle
    '09 FE450
    Motorcycle
    '07 F800S
    Also consider there are aftermarket TPMS sensors which can be programmed to mimic the OE sensor and assume its ESN. I don't now if this is possible after the original has died, whether the numbers can be read off the printed label? Does require a programming tool from the aftermarket TPMS vendor but does not require access to a BMW tool.
    2016 Yamaha FJR1300A; 2016 Beta 430RS; 2007 BMW F800S; 2009 Husaberg FE450; 2016 Subaru Outback; 2018 F150; 2013 Tesla Model S 85; 1983 Porsche 928S; 9 cats 

  21. #15
    Runmyownlife's Avatar
    Points: 13,895, Level: 81

    Real Name
    Andrew
    Location
    Calgary, Alberta
    Joined
    Feb 2017
    Online
    6 Hours Ago
    Posts
    942 / 0 / 0 / 0
    Motorcycle
    '08 F800 ST
    Motorcycle
    '08 F800 ST
    Quote Originally Posted by cygnet View Post
    To get that battery to explode I think you have to put it in a fire, and even then a 3 volt battery is not going to make a very big bang. But if you can find CR2032's with welded tabs go for it as for heat damaging the battery how hot do you think it gets when it's welded? Just my .02

    It's not the bang but the toxic smoke. With the proper tools and technique, the hot iron is in contact with the battery for a second (very little heat transfer). An under powered soldering iron and poor technique will allow a lot of heat transfer.

  22. #16
    mikef800's Avatar
    Points: 1,831, Level: 26

    Location
    Wairarapa
    Joined
    Jan 2018
    Online
    3 Weeks Ago
    Posts
    29 / 0 / 0 / 0
    Have just replaced the battery in one of my RDC sensors. Here are some additional pointers :

    - A rotary tool (Dremel) with the small cutting disk is very useful in removing most of the black potting compound. All electronics are below the battery so there is nothing you can really damage down to the level of the battery. Take care. Have patience.

    - Solder the connections.

    - Ensure the insulation under the old battery on top of the exposed circuit board is intact. I cut a disc of insulation tape and slid it under the exposed negative terminal that was left after detaching the old battery.

    - Extend the negative terminal left in the bottom of the pit after removing the old battery by soldering on a small wire. Cut a small notch in the black potting compound to allow that negative wire up the edge of the replacement battery once install.

    - Use a replacement battery with the spot welded solder terminals attached. Carefully bend the negative solder terminals around the edge of the new battery so that they stick up towards to positive side ( negative will be down, positive exposed on top when installed.

    - Tin the bottom of the end of the exposed positive terminal as detached from the old battery. Carefully bend the positive solder terminal of the new battery back over the positive face of the battery.

    - Slot the battery into position. The solder terminals on the battery should now all be exposed where you can get at them easily while the new battery is in position.

    - Solder the negative wire extension to the negative battery terminal which should now be sticking upwards at the edge of the new battery. Solder the positive terminal down onto the bent back battery terminal. Ensure both are tinned beforehand so this should be quick with minimal heating of the battery.

    - Was concerned about the minimal thermal properties and strength of standard hot melt glue so opted for this hot melt electronics potting compound. This stuff : https://nz.rs-online.com/web/p/potti...pounds/4486830


    Testing before installation? I ordered a cheap wakeup tool but that is going to take 6 weeks to arrive.

    In the mean time I can confirm that centrifugal force ( spinning them ) will wake them up. Mine at least Using a 150mm 8mm bolt and a couple of nuts and washers I mounted the sensor in the 4-jaw chuck of my lathe. Mounted approx 100mm off centre in the same orientation as inside the wheel rim. Spun it up to 600-700 rpm for 20 seconds and bingo! TAKE CARE. DO NOT STAND IN FRONT OF IT! THIS HAS THE POTENTIAL OF BEING VERY DANGEROUS! Removed from the lathe, walked it over to the bike and it showed up on the display after 10 seconds or so.

    Batteries :

    The original battery is a CR2050HR which is 5.0 mm thick and has a capacity of 350 mAh. Most people are advocating replacing with a CR2032 which is 3.2 mm thick and has a capacity of 210 mAh.

    Both are fine. The CR2050 will give you longer life between replacement but seems to cost three or four times as much as the CR2032. It will be a little more fiddly to fit space-wise. The CR2032 is thinner and easier to fit but will have only 2/3 of the life. The 'HR' part of the CR2050HR mean 'heat resistant'. I don't know how significant this might be unless you are racing or doing something more extreme.

    Hope this helps.
    M
    Last edited by mikef800; 02-26-20 at 02:26 AM.

  23. LikesMGD109, Daboo, ruffyz liked this post
  24. #17
    Points: 2,287, Level: 30

    Location
    Northern Virginia
    Joined
    Feb 2017
    Online
    03-11-20
    Posts
    7 / 0 / 0 / 0
    Just a quick update. The senor I bought from a Chinese ebay seller in early 2017 is still working well. Currently you can get these for about $25 each including shipping. See my earlier post in this thread for my take on advantages/disadvantages of these sensors as compared with replacing a battery.

  25. #18
    Daboo's Avatar
    Points: 44,112, Level: 100

    Real Name
    Chris
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Joined
    Jun 2014
    Online
    6 Hours Ago
    Posts
    4,205 / 0 / 9 / 3
    Motorcycle
    '14 F800 GT
    So thanks to Nova Chris, I did some researching for several hours and started looking at TPMS sensors and the "wake up" tools. The bottom line is there are more options out there than paying hundreds of dollars to a BMW dealership to replace your TPMS. This will be a little long, but I'll walk you through my mental process last night and where it led me.


    Nova Chris had said that he'd much rather buy a new sensor, even if it was a Chinese clone, than try replacing the battery on the OEM sensor. And even with the expense of the tool, he'd rather go that way. A year later, his sensors were still working. Great!

    Amazon has a number of Schrader brand sensors for BMWs. Some are as low as $22. I ended up buying Baird Stone Tire Pressure Monitoring Sensor 8532732. It was $38, but looked just like the pictures I took of my own sensor and had the same part number (8532732). The less expensive ones had the part number for the RT, and I wasn't sure if they would work. Plus, the others looked like they were clones with no markings, not actually Schrader products.

    Now the "problem" was how to avoid spending a couple hundred dollars for the local BMW dealership to wake them up.

    Replacing the battery and using the same sensor was one way that would work...as long as I didn't screw up the sensor.

    I've also read that you can wake up the sensor by filling the tire, then pulling the valve stem out, which causes a rapid loss of air like a flat tire might do. Hmm...it might just work.

    But then there were these TPMS tools on Amazon that ranged all over the spectrum for cost and some were down in the $10-20 range. Those however were for GM or Ford vehicles. Why were they so cheap and some other tools so expensive? Nova Chris had bought the Ateq VT15. Amazon has these at @$82. Not as expensive as the $160 that some ran, but not as cheap as the GM tools. My cheap soul objected to spending any more money for the tool than needed.

    Then I stumbled on two YouTube videos.



    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Bmw Motorcycle Tyre Pressure Sensor Replacement - YouTube.jpg 
Views:	11 
Size:	141.3 KB 
ID:	358513

    That's one of the GM tools!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

Name:	BMW R1200RT Tires And New TPMS Install.jpg 
Views:	39 
Size:	241.1 KB 
ID:	358515  
    Elnathan - 2014 BMW F800GT
    IBA# 49894 True Rounder = 0-20's - Rounder -- to -- 100's+ Red Hot Rounder

    John 14:6 

  26. #19
    Daboo's Avatar
    Points: 44,112, Level: 100

    Real Name
    Chris
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Joined
    Jun 2014
    Online
    6 Hours Ago
    Posts
    4,205 / 0 / 9 / 3
    Motorcycle
    '14 F800 GT
    Only one video is allowed per post, so here's the rest...




    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	BMW R1200RT Tires And New TPMS Install.jpg 
Views:	39 
Size:	241.1 KB 
ID:	358515


    And that's the GM tool too! Not only that, but he shows you how to use it with the GS-911 tool.


    So I ended up buying the JDIAG 2IN1 TPMS Relearn Tool Super EL50448 for GM and Ford Tire Pressure Monitor Sensor TPMS Reset Tool 2020 Edition for $17.75.


    The JDIAG tool arrives in a couple days. The sensor won't arrive for a couple weeks. So it'll be a few weeks before I can confirm it works, but I'm pretty confident, especially when the two videos show similar tools being used on BMWs.


    Chris
    Elnathan - 2014 BMW F800GT
    IBA# 49894 True Rounder = 0-20's - Rounder -- to -- 100's+ Red Hot Rounder

    John 14:6 

  27. LikesRunmyownlife, Jethro5 liked this post
  28. #20
    Points: 572, Level: 11

    Joined
    Aug 2019
    Online
    3 Weeks Ago
    Posts
    18 / 0 / 0 / 0
    Thanks, Greg! This is good stuff!! It'll be good info for anyone with TPMS.

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •