Tire Recommendations - BMW F800 Riders Forum & Registry



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  1. #1
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    The last similar thread was in 2012, so maybe I'm okay to introduce a new thread???

    I'm looking for your opinions on what tires you'll put on next for your F800R/ST/GT and any other variants or brands that are not a GS. Sorry, GS owners, but your tires probably won't work for what I want to do.

    I've been running Dunlop Roadsmart IIIs for two changes so far. The tires have worked well and I have no problems going for another set.

    I had the Metzeler Roadtec 01s and liked them a lot, but they seem to have worn down faster than expected. I'm willing to give them another try though and see if it was just the roads down south that ate them up.

    The Michelin Road 5 seems to be the latest rage.

    The Continental Road Attack 3 has great reviews and they are high on my list.

    And the Pirelli Angel GT II is supposed to be good...but it is pricey.


    Like everyone, I want the perfect tire. Outstanding wet grip. Outstanding tire life. Outstanding dry grip is a given these days.

    The magazine reviews and even the customer reviews on places like Revzilla lack one thing...longevity. How long will the tire last?

    So...any thoughts?

    Edit: Dunlop has a $40 rebate on their tires till the end of April. Continental just offered a $60 rebate.
    Elnathan - 2014 BMW F800GT
    IBA# 49894 True Rounder = 0-20's - Rounder -- to -- 100's+ Red Hot Rounder

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  3. #2
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    Do you ever get the feeling with all the different tread designs out there, that this is not an exact science? That it is more like trying to figure out what attracts us, the buyer, than what actually works? Like buying fishing lures. The only thing some of the fishing lures catch, is the fisherman.

    Chris
    Elnathan - 2014 BMW F800GT
    IBA# 49894 True Rounder = 0-20's - Rounder -- to -- 100's+ Red Hot Rounder

    John 14:6 

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    notacop is offline The original Schwartz Wald Troll
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    Yah. If you are not a sport rider and require the utmost stiction of your tires, Shinko makes the 712 and other street pattern tires for probably half of what the biggy makers charge.

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  8. #4
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    Definitely, Metzeler Roadtec 01. Superior grip and handling in dry conditions. On par in the wet. Wear a little bit faster than PR4s but what the heck. Handling in twisties in the dry is giving me the most fun....

    2013 F800GT Valencia Orange 

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    So Frank...have you any info on how long they are lasting? Especially in comparison with any other brands you've used?

    I loved the Metzeler Roadtec 01 on my GT for my first post-retirement road trip. We did about 4000 miles down from Seattle to Utah and back through Colorado. Just before leaving on my next trip, I noticed the center inch was worn badly, while the rest of the tire looked like new. That's the problem with riding on freeways most of the way there and back...the center gets the wear. I changed them at 6000 miles halfway through my second trip. In contrast, the Z8s lasted about 11-12,000 miles...almost double.

    Chris
    Elnathan - 2014 BMW F800GT
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    I have been very happy with the Dunflop Roadsmart III tires that I installed on my R12RS. I like them much better than the original Z8 tires that were on the bike from the factory. Those tires lasted 9 and 10K miles on the RS and I will be happy if the Roadsmarts go that distance.
    Richard - Current bikes: 2016 BMW R1200RS, 2018 16.6 kWh Zero S, 2011 Royal Enfield Bullet 500 Classic, 2009 BMW F650GS, 2005 Triumph T-100 Bonneville, 2002 Yamaha FZ1 (FZS1000N) and a 1978 Honda Kick 'N Go Senior. 

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    Chris, I am not an aggressive rider; I am a granddad and I ride like one. Super traction on wet, slick roads is not much of a factor for me since I get off the bike when it gets slippery, I do not go racing around on wet roads. The factors in choosing a motorcycle tire for me are: (1) how long will they last, (2) how quiet are they, (3) how evenly will they wear, (4) will they cup too soon. I have used most of the manufacturers tires that you have listed. Dunlops were fine for all my factors above; I would buy them again. Metzlers were noisy on regular, smooth roads, plus they cupped pretty quickly; I won't buy Metzlers again. Pirellis were fine for all my factors, but they were the most expensive and probably not good enough to be worth the extra cost; I won't buy Pirellis again. Continentals were fine for most of my factors, but they did not wear as long as Dunlops and Pirellis. My personal winner is Michelin, they do fine on all my factors and the price is reasonable.

    However, tires designs change and new technology and manufacturing processes change, so who knows what next year will bring. I am open to trying something new that appears promising.
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    One thing you can be sure of is that when a tire manufacturer introduces a newly-designed tire it will be more expensive than their previous tire model - and they will claim that it is 20% better in all respects than that old tire.
    Richard - Current bikes: 2016 BMW R1200RS, 2018 16.6 kWh Zero S, 2011 Royal Enfield Bullet 500 Classic, 2009 BMW F650GS, 2005 Triumph T-100 Bonneville, 2002 Yamaha FZ1 (FZS1000N) and a 1978 Honda Kick 'N Go Senior. 

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    I just ordered a set of road 5's this morning. Picked them up for only $300 delivered to my door. I mount and balance myself. My last 2 sets were road 4's and I really liked them. I always wear the rear out first with a flat spot down the middle because I do a lot of high speed freeway riding and engine breaking. My front usually gets cupped instead of wearing the tread down too low.

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    08' F800ST- side panniers & Shad SH45 top case, Russell Day Long seat, MRA Vario Windscreen, SW Motech crash bars, ZTechnik exhaust, PC-8 fuseblock, Stebel Nautilus horn, Throttlemeister throttle lock, SW Motech handlebar risers, LED fog lights, highway pegs 

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    Tire data:
    Rear: Metzeler Z8, 15373 km; Micheiin PR4, 13254 km; Metzeler Roadtec 01, 10284 km
    Front: Metzeler Z8, 15373 km; Michelin PR4, 15027 km; Metzeler Roadtec 01, 9778 km (replaced early due to upcoming long trip, should last another 2000 - 3000 km)

    2013 F800GT Valencia Orange 

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  19. #11
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    Thanks, Frank. It is hard to compare mileage from one location to another. But...when a rider can compare what he gets from one set of tires to another set over the same type of riding and roads, than that is meaningful.

    I find it interesting that your experience is similar to mine. My Metzeler Z8s lasted me about 11,000 miles or 17,700 km. I think I could've run them another 1-2000 miles maybe. I was expecting, based on Metzeler's claims, that the Metzeler Roadtec 01 would last even longer. I had Michelin PR4s on my Honda NT700V and those had 17,000 miles on them when I sold it and it looked like they'd last another 2-3000 miles more.

    The Metzeler Roadtec 01 tires were a disappointment. On one hand, they showed a lot of tread on the sides when I took them off the bike at 6000 miles (9665 km). But that center inch was worn a lot. And that's where there was no tread to gauge the amount of wear. What caused me to look twice at the tire, was that the rest of the tire was clean, but when I had stopped, only that center inch was dirty. I thought that was interesting, and looked closer...and found that's where all the wear was. The tire was not overinflated, per specs. I had it at 42 psi. Should I have run it at 40 psi? Or 38 psi? to get the contact patch wider? At 6000 miles, I could easily be looking at two sets of tires a year.

    I like the Dunlop Roadsmart III tires. I've never felt like I lacked traction. And on a performance vs price ratio, they score high. I also like how they have tread that crosses the center of the tire. No matter how much we want to wear the sides of the tire, we still put the most miles on our bikes in a straight line. So the wear is in the center.

    I'm leaning (is there an unintentional pun there?) to the Continental Road Attack 3 tires. Reviews are very good. Wet and dry traction is high. Handling is high. With the $60 rebate, that puts them at the low end of the price spectrum. And included in the price, is a 3-year roadside assistance program. Not bad. They are doing something different with their tire to get more life out of them. They use different temperatures and pressure on the center than on the outside of the tread to make it harder, and to hopefully last longer. It's a single compound tire. So how well does it work in the real world?

    And if all goes well, I'll have the stuff to change my own tires here shortly. Harbor Freight has air compressors on sale right now. I already have my tire irons, and I think I can remove/replace the tire with those. So when I buy the next set of tires, I'll just leave them in the garage till the best time to change them is.

    Chris
    Elnathan - 2014 BMW F800GT
    IBA# 49894 True Rounder = 0-20's - Rounder -- to -- 100's+ Red Hot Rounder

    John 14:6 

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    Hi Chris (Daboo), I am particularly fond of the Roadtec 01s because of their superior handling in corners. Yes, the mileage was worse than the MPR's and Z8s, but it can very well be that my driving style also had changed... . Handling in the wet is equal to the Michelins, no significant difference.
    I can not confirm your experience that the center wears much, much faster than the sides. I do try to avoid freeways as much as possible, attempting to use the whole tread area from side to side. Rear motorcycle tires always wear faster in the center than the sides, in my experience the Roadtec 01 is not worse in this than the MPR4 or Z8, as far as I can remember.

    P.S. I am inflating my tires to 2.5 bar front and 2.9 bar rear, that is 36 and 42 psi, respectively.

    2013 F800GT Valencia Orange 

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    I have just got around to dropping my rear wheel in at my local shop for changing. It had the standard Z8 fitted and has lasted just over 11,000 miles but was squared off due to the high motorway distance it has done. I have been very happy with its performance on all kinds of roads I have travelled including two-up.

    I bought Z6s as replacements at the end of last year but only because these were available at just over 1/2 the Z8 price (see Richards comment above !).
    There was a possibility that the tyres might be old stock but they are stamped as manufactured June 2018 (just next to 'Made in China'!).

    The Z8s have given me total confidence in my bikes handling and I often surprise myself by scraping a toe on a bend when I am not really trying (I don't do 'Hanging off the seat'). I might though have considered some of the alternative brands if this thread had been raised before I purchased.

    Ian
    Last edited by Norfolk UK; 04-02-19 at 09:59 AM. Reason: typo
    2014 GT Orange. Just the comfort pack and heated grips - not into gizmos.

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    Mr Daboo

    Metzeler RoadTec 01 as the chosen tyre of BMW \are the go for true sports touring.
    Not sure about the capability in the snow/sleet don't get it here in OZ where I live & ride.

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    And then there's my opinion Chris....

    I am not on a BMW but the front tire I run on my Suzuki is a Shinko and it wears real well and is good in the rain. Once a tire gets to about 80% worn but still legal up here in the Great NorthWET its time to change. But for the rear, theres a reason why Daboo will not ride behind me. When my rear CAR tire goes 'Super Nova' he wants to be in front of the blast wave.
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    Uh, oh, talking darkside here!
    Do you have a difficult time keeping up with Daboo on that bastard tire combo?

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    I just replaced a set of Roadsmart III's with just about 12K miles on them. I liked them very much. I am also a fan of Michelin PRs. I just bought a set of PR5s and have been riding on them about 600 miles now. They feel great on the road. We'll see how they wear. The Dunlops probably would have run longer, but rear tire went flat, and I always replace in pairs.


    Quote Originally Posted by Daboo View Post
    Thanks, Frank. It is hard to compare mileage from one location to another. But...when a rider can compare what he gets from one set of tires to another set over the same type of riding and roads, than that is meaningful.

    I find it interesting that your experience is similar to mine. My Metzeler Z8s lasted me about 11,000 miles or 17,700 km. I think I could've run them another 1-2000 miles maybe. I was expecting, based on Metzeler's claims, that the Metzeler Roadtec 01 would last even longer. I had Michelin PR4s on my Honda NT700V and those had 17,000 miles on them when I sold it and it looked like they'd last another 2-3000 miles more.

    The Metzeler Roadtec 01 tires were a disappointment. On one hand, they showed a lot of tread on the sides when I took them off the bike at 6000 miles (9665 km). But that center inch was worn a lot. And that's where there was no tread to gauge the amount of wear. What caused me to look twice at the tire, was that the rest of the tire was clean, but when I had stopped, only that center inch was dirty. I thought that was interesting, and looked closer...and found that's where all the wear was. The tire was not overinflated, per specs. I had it at 42 psi. Should I have run it at 40 psi? Or 38 psi? to get the contact patch wider? At 6000 miles, I could easily be looking at two sets of tires a year.

    I like the Dunlop Roadsmart III tires. I've never felt like I lacked traction. And on a performance vs price ratio, they score high. I also like how they have tread that crosses the center of the tire. No matter how much we want to wear the sides of the tire, we still put the most miles on our bikes in a straight line. So the wear is in the center.

    I'm leaning (is there an unintentional pun there?) to the Continental Road Attack 3 tires. Reviews are very good. Wet and dry traction is high. Handling is high. With the $60 rebate, that puts them at the low end of the price spectrum. And included in the price, is a 3-year roadside assistance program. Not bad. They are doing something different with their tire to get more life out of them. They use different temperatures and pressure on the center than on the outside of the tread to make it harder, and to hopefully last longer. It's a single compound tire. So how well does it work in the real world?

    And if all goes well, I'll have the stuff to change my own tires here shortly. Harbor Freight has air compressors on sale right now. I already have my tire irons, and I think I can remove/replace the tire with those. So when I buy the next set of tires, I'll just leave them in the garage till the best time to change them is.

    Chris

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    Quote Originally Posted by notacop View Post
    Uh, oh, talking darkside here!
    Do you have a difficult time keeping up with Daboo on that bastard tire combo?
    No, I don't think so but then, we are not racing. He has 90 HP and 470 pounds wet and weighs about 160, and I have 54 HP at 625 pounds wet and am 210 pounds so hands down he wins. But the few road trips we make in the mountain twisty's I keep up fine. I can lean over far enough to scrape the 'Center' stand on slow corners and on real fast corners I scrape the front tupperware and the center stand both. Most Harleys hate me in the corners. Factory tire is a 160/60 HR 14 and I am running a 155/65 HR 14 that is a bit taller so it also corrects my 10% speedo error to about 3% error.

    I am better looking than him.

    I told Daboo that I will not debate Darkside on this forum so I must use caution here. Something like being naked and smacking a hornets nest with a short stick.
    Retired US ARMY
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    "I told Daboo that I will not debate Darkside on this forum so I must use caution here"

    Funny how that is a item of contention. A friend pulled an old Indian out of her barn to sell to a mutual friend. The pictures of the tires they had back in 40's, early 50's were showed a pattern just like a car tire. The well rounded shape of modern tires wasn't what they ran on. http://coutant.com/indian/
    The bike has come a long way from the rust pit since then

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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveJ98092 View Post
    ...But the few road trips we make in the mountain twisty's I keep up fine. I can lean over far enough to scrape the 'Center' stand on slow corners and on real fast corners I scrape the front tupperware and the center stand both...
    I let him think that. Two riders have gone off the road trying to keep up with me on the few times I take things fast. The last one said that he used to race. I'm not interested in making it a third. And I've never had to get my bike over far enough to scrape anything. The GT is very fast in corners.

    Quote Originally Posted by DaveJ98092 View Post
    ...I am better looking than him...
    That's debatable.


    Quote Originally Posted by DaveJ98092 View Post
    ...I told Daboo that I will not debate Darkside on this forum so I must use caution here. Something like being naked and smacking a hornets nest with a short stick.
    Smart man.

    Chris
    Elnathan - 2014 BMW F800GT
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    John 14:6 

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    Quote Originally Posted by notacop View Post
    "I told Daboo that I will not debate Darkside on this forum so I must use caution here"

    Funny how that is a item of contention. A friend pulled an old Indian out of her barn to sell to a mutual friend. The pictures of the tires they had back in 40's, early 50's were showed a pattern just like a car tire. The well rounded shape of modern tires wasn't what they ran on. http://coutant.com/indian/
    The bike has come a long way from the rust pit since then
    When I was a moderator over on BurgmanUSA, I finally had enough of the fighting over going to the "darkside". Some riders just wanted information on how to do it. So I set up a thread just for information to be passed on how to do it. If you started saying the world was going to come to an end and your tire would blow up and kill everyone in a 50 mile radius, I simply deleted the post and made reference to the ground rules established at the beginning. It toned things down considerably and worked well. One of the secrets to raising kids is to be consistent...it works well with forums too.

    I doubt darkside discussions for F800 bikes would go far. I can just see a GS rider with a car tire on the back. The image is laughable.

    Chris
    Elnathan - 2014 BMW F800GT
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    John 14:6 

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    Quote Originally Posted by notacop View Post
    "I told Daboo that I will not debate Darkside on this forum so I must use caution here"

    Funny how that is a item of contention. A friend pulled an old Indian out of her barn to sell to a mutual friend. The pictures of the tires they had back in 40's, early 50's were showed a pattern just like a car tire. The well rounded shape of modern tires wasn't what they ran on. http://coutant.com/indian/
    The bike has come a long way from the rust pit since then
    My uncle ran a motorcycle shop back thru the 40's up till late 60's. He put many truck tires on Harleys and Indians. But he had a special setup that he'd raise the back of the bike up into it and while someone held the throttle at about 3500 RPM he'd pull a lever and a curved shoe would rub on the tire and burn the sides more rounded. He'd only take the square edge down some. Lots of smoke.
    I learnt to ride a Harley with a truck tire on the rear.

    And in normal riding, I too never get angled over enough to scrape anything. But I have pushed the limits a few times. It like my top speed is about 115 MPH (GPS) but sitting on a scooter with nothing between your legs to help hold you down is not an everyday ride. I can go 100 MPH all day long. But my body can not do the 'Track Day' rides anymore.

    But I would not mind having a F800GT and keep M/T's on it. I am not commuting 82 miles round trip in I-405 traffic so a shifter bike would be ok now.
    Retired US ARMY
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  39. #23
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    I think I'm going to go with a third set of Dunlop Roadsmart III tires. I've toyed with the idea of each of the different tread patterns and claims of each manufacturer and they all claim the same things. Outstanding wet and dry performance and long tire life. I know the Roadtec 01's let me down once. Do I want to try for a second time?

    But the Dunlop Roadsmart III tires have worked well for me. Their rebate expires at the end of April, so I'll order them beforehand. I have 10,000 miles on them now and will probably get another 1-2000 miles more before circumstances force me to change them.


    In the meantime, I'm slowly assembling the tools and equipment I need to do my own tire changes. I have the tire irons now. I know where to get an air compressor to reseat the bead on the tire. There are several options to balancing the tires. And it gives me an opportunity to look at the brakes and do some preventative maintenance at the same time.

    Why am I changing my own tires? I can easily afford to have the dealership do it. But they raised their price, and it got me to deciding to make the leap to do it myself. I know it isn't rocket science. I did this on car tires at a service station and my bicycle tires growing up. Doing my own tire changes allows me to schedule it at my own convenience, not the shop's convenience.

    And doing some of these things yourself is a great opportunity to know your bike and how it works. I'll be the first to admit that I'm not a mechanic. But the hardest part of this is to pick up the wrench to start. After that, you realize how simple and rewarding it is to do it yourself.

    Chris
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    Quote Originally Posted by Daboo View Post
    In the meantime, I'm slowly assembling the tools and equipment I need to do my own tire changes. I have the tire irons now. I know where to get an air compressor to reseat the bead on the tire. There are several options to balancing the tires. And it gives me an opportunity to look at the brakes and do some preventative maintenance at the same time.

    Why am I changing my own tires? I can easily afford to have the dealership do it. But they raised their price, and it got me to deciding to make the leap to do it myself. I know it isn't rocket science. I did this on car tires at a service station and my bicycle tires growing up. Doing my own tire changes allows me to schedule it at my own convenience, not the shop's convenience.
    Bought my NoMar CH200 just over 2 years ago. Great investment. Perhaps the most important tool is the stand to hold wheel where you can work in it. With proper lube and rim secured one can almost mount a front tire without tools.

    Local Yamaha dealer posts flat rare tire service prices. $90 to mount and balance rear tire. An independent shop used to charge only $25 for wheel off bike but is grumpy if one purchased tire elsewhere. These days Cycle Gear charges that, if you buy the tire from them. Their tire prices are not attractive.

    In any case I can mount a tire myself in less time than I can ride to/from most shops. Not counting the time they add doing the work. Not counting how most want a day or two to do the work.

    Same as with a pickup truck, tire mounting tools makes one popular. Recently took 26 tires to the dump. Have been riding 18,000 miles/year.
    2016 Yamaha FJR1300A; 2016 Beta 430RS; 2007 BMW F800S; 2009 Husaberg FE450; 2016 Subaru Outback; 2018 F150; 2013 Tesla Model S 85; 1983 Porsche 928S; 9 cats 

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    Chris, if you use some gallon milk jug container plastic as shields for the tire irons you should not mar up the rims. I have set the bead using my small 'Slime' 12 volt tire pump. But I do have a Porter Cable 26 gallon 135 PSI 110 volt compressor and wall air lines in my garage too.

    I also have a small 110v air compressor without a tank, a 'Free to Me' side of the road pile of junk with a FREE sign. The tank was rotted but the pump works. Its yours if you want it.
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    Thanks, Dave, but I think I'll look for a new one and not spend the time (and money) trying to find a tank.

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    OK. I do have a good tank too. Just never mated them to each other. And I was just going to buy a portable 11 gallon air tank from HarborFreight anyway. That way I can charge the tank and carry it to where I need it. $40 each.
    https://www.harborfreight.com/11-gal...ank-65595.html

    But just for small jobs and filling Motorcycle tires one of these Pancake style Air Compressors will do fine
    https://www.harborfreight.com/3-gal-...sor-61615.html

    Just saying.
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    Speaking of tire mounting, my son-in-law was having no end of problems getting a replacement tire to seat on the rear wheel of my daughter's 1981 R65LS. So he decided to just remove the tube from the wheel and run the tire tubeless. Once he did that and pumped the tire to 60 psi, he managed to get the new tire to seat correctly. He tells me that the tire is holding air just fine. I have no idea what he did to replace the hole in the rim with a new tubeless valve core. Hopefully, he remembered to balance the wheel and to also reduce the tire pressure to 36 psi.
    Richard - Current bikes: 2016 BMW R1200RS, 2018 16.6 kWh Zero S, 2011 Royal Enfield Bullet 500 Classic, 2009 BMW F650GS, 2005 Triumph T-100 Bonneville, 2002 Yamaha FZ1 (FZS1000N) and a 1978 Honda Kick 'N Go Senior. 

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    Quote Originally Posted by Richard230 View Post
    Speaking of tire mounting, my son-in-law was having no end of problems getting a replacement tire to seat on the rear wheel of my daughter's 1981 R65LS. So he decided to just remove the tube from the wheel and run the tire tubeless. Once he did that and pumped the tire to 60 psi, he managed to get the new tire to seat correctly. He tells me that the tire is holding air just fine. I have no idea what he did to replace the hole in the rim with a new tubeless valve core. Hopefully, he remembered to balance the wheel and to also reduce the tire pressure to 36 psi.
    I think that son in law needs to rethink this. REALLY! There must be something wrong. Rust in the safety valley of the rim and bead area? Wrong lube used? Wrong size tire? Wrong size tube? I'd advise Daughter NOT to ride this bike this way. It would not take much for the bead to pop loose and deflate in a split second. It's cheaper to have a PRO do this tough job than to pay for 6 people to carry your daughter out of the church (sorry)

    If you look at most tubeless rims, the bead area is deeper to grip the rubber tighter and more surface tension areas.

    Dish soap is not as slick as a real tire lube in the bead area. Is he using a talc type power on the tube so the tube can flex around as it is filled. I have seen tubes be too small to fill a larger "Upgraded" tire. The rm should be scrubbed down on the inside and maybe even run some 000 Steel wool around it to smooth it out as shiny as a new penny.
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveJ98092 View Post
    I think that son in law needs to rethink this. REALLY! There must be something wrong. Rust in the safety valley of the rim and bead area? Wrong lube used? Wrong size tire? Wrong size tube? I'd advise Daughter NOT to ride this bike this way. It would not take much for the bead to pop loose and deflate in a split second. It's cheaper to have a PRO do this tough job than to pay for 6 people to carry your daughter out of the church (sorry)

    If you look at most tubeless rims, the bead area is deeper to grip the rubber tighter and more surface tension areas.

    Dish soap is not as slick as a real tire lube in the bead area. Is he using a talc type power on the tube so the tube can flex around as it is filled. I have seen tubes be too small to fill a larger "Upgraded" tire. The rm should be scrubbed down on the inside and maybe even run some 000 Steel wool around it to smooth it out as shiny as a new penny.
    All of those suggestions were used when mounting the tire and tube. (I helped with the job.) We just were not able to get the tire to seat along one 3" section of the rim and I was going to give it another try this weekend. But son-in-law jumped the gun and bodged away.

    Frankly, the wheel did look a lot like a tubeless design to me as it had a safety lip on the inside that looked exactly like the design of a modern tubeless wheel.

    I just found out that what he did when converting the wheel to tubeless was to cut out the tube valve, keeping the rubber around it, and glued the valve and its surrounding rubber to the inside of the wheel. The valve is secured by the valve stem nut and sealed by both the RTV and the air pressure within the wheel. A rather creative bodge, but nothing that I would have done - or thought of, for that matter. Right now my daughter is not too sure if she wants to ride the bike right now and plans to let her husband ride for a while to see how the tire holds up.
    Richard - Current bikes: 2016 BMW R1200RS, 2018 16.6 kWh Zero S, 2011 Royal Enfield Bullet 500 Classic, 2009 BMW F650GS, 2005 Triumph T-100 Bonneville, 2002 Yamaha FZ1 (FZS1000N) and a 1978 Honda Kick 'N Go Senior. 

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    Is amazing how casual and sloppy a common rubber tire valve stem installs in a rim. Search reveals many mount tires tubeless on R65LS. A bit confused about "LS wheels" and "snowflake." Common comment is the difficulty in finding a suitable valve stem. Some said they got suitable metal stems from autoparts store. The "standard" size rubber valve stem is said to be 11.3mm. Sometimes labeled 10mm as the diameter of the body which fits in an 11.3mm hole with a gasket. There is a skinny 8.3mm hole valve stem available, you just have to know to look for it. Perhaps one of those will fit the LS wheel? OTOH, simply drill the rim to accept the common valve stem. It won't really matter if one goes back to a tube.

    Stumped at how one can have problems seating a tubed tire on the rim? If a rimlock was involved I would say to check the bead at the rimlock. Otherwise I would be worried the tube was pinched and holding tire out on one end preventing it from seating 180° opposite.
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    Quote Originally Posted by N4HHE View Post
    Is amazing how casual and sloppy a common rubber tire valve stem installs in a rim. Search reveals many mount tires tubeless on R65LS. A bit confused about "LS wheels" and "snowflake." Common comment is the difficulty in finding a suitable valve stem. Some said they got suitable metal stems from autoparts store. The "standard" size rubber valve stem is said to be 11.3mm. Sometimes labeled 10mm as the diameter of the body which fits in an 11.3mm hole with a gasket. There is a skinny 8.3mm hole valve stem available, you just have to know to look for it. Perhaps one of those will fit the LS wheel? OTOH, simply drill the rim to accept the common valve stem. It won't really matter if one goes back to a tube.

    Stumped at how one can have problems seating a tubed tire on the rim? If a rimlock was involved I would say to check the bead at the rimlock. Otherwise I would be worried the tube was pinched and holding tire out on one end preventing it from seating 180° opposite.
    The LS does not use a "snowflake" wheel. It uses a wheel very similar in design to the cast wheel design used on the later BMW airheads, which used tubeless tires. The main difference seems to be that the rim is cast in one piece and then attached in some way to the cast spokes as there are thin cracks between the rim and the spoke assemblies. There were no rimlocks or anything else that would have prevented the tire to completely seat on the wheel. We tried all sort of lubricants to get the tire bead to move up the rim so that it would seat properly, but could not get every portion of the bead to seat correctly. While I have had problems mounting tires before and getting beads to seat, I never had an issue like which couldn't be resolved with tire lube and lots of air pressure. There was just something odd about the attraction of the tire rubber and the inside of the wheel rim. The attached photo shows the design of the LS wheels.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

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  53. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Richard230 View Post
    We tried all sort of lubricants to get the tire bead to move up the rim so that it would seat properly, but could not get every portion of the bead to seat correctly. While I have had problems mounting tires before and getting beads to seat, I never had an issue like which couldn't be resolved with tire lube and lots of air pressure. There was just something odd about the attraction of the tire rubber and the inside of the wheel rim. The attached photo shows the design of the LS wheels.
    I just had a “think”. Were using a tubeless tire with tube on tube rim? The tubeless tire might be a smidgeon smaller rim ID than tube-type so as to better seal air?

    I have mounted tubeless Dunlop D803 trials tires with tubes on spoked rims and not noticed a difference. So maybe not?
    Be
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    Quote Originally Posted by N4HHE View Post
    I just had a “think”. Were using a tubeless tire with tube on tube rim? The tubeless tire might be a smidgeon smaller rim ID than tube-type so as to better seal air?

    I have mounted tubeless Dunlop D803 trials tires with tubes on spoked rims and not noticed a difference. So maybe not?
    Be
    It was a Michelin tube/tubeless 120/90-18 Pilot ACTIV bias-ply tire, which is the same tire we installed on the front wheel. The fact that it was a 120 size and not the stock 4" width might have had something to do with the trouble we had, but she has been using 120 width tires on the rear wheel for many years with no similar issues, although this is the first time we installed a Pilot ACTIV tire.
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    Well, Richard, you may have something there, maybe. A 4 inch tube is inflating out to fill a 100 mm and may be having a hard time going that extra 20 mm, almost 1 inch wider.

    I was assuming that this was a steel rim with steel spokes. If its a cast aluminum rim it may just be designed to a tubeless tire. Like said above, if needed just drill the valve core's hole out so a 11.3 mm 83 degree bolt in valve stem can seal to it. If you go back to tubeless the old style core will still seal. I use these type:
    Click image for larger version. 

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    OR

    Click image for larger version. 

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    But NEVER EVER

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Dave, I suggested using those mechanical-seating valve cores to my son-in-law, but he wanted to do it his way. He is just not happy unless he is bodging a repair.

    In other tire/wheel news, my friend who rides a 2007 F800ST ran over a pot hole in one of our famous California freeways this morning. Attached is a photo of the result.

    He plans to straighten the rim using a hammer and a block of wood.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

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    That's not bad. I'd try the same, especially if it is holding air now.

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    Richard, I wouldn't let him park in in my driveway. Hope he has a real good life insurance policy. Daughter needs to see the valve stems he should be using. Heck they are only $5 for two of them on Ebay. Is his life that worthless? My wife would snap a knott in the back of my head if I tried to pull that stupid stunt.

    Sorry to rant. But there is a fix for STUPID. Death cures it every time, no relaps.
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    Dave, he is currently replacing the axle and CV joints on an old Toyota just for fun and plans to rebuild a 30-year old Honda engine . He is doing both projects without a service manual, naturally. He loves doing stuff just to see if he can do it the hard way. He is not happy unless things go wrong and break and he can find some way to repair them by watching videos and reading stuff on the internet. Photos attached of his current projects now that the LS wheel is "fixed". I might add that the more you tell him not to do something the more likely he is going to do it. Sound familiar to anyone?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveJ98092 View Post
    Richard, I wouldn't let him park in in my driveway. Hope he has a real good life insurance policy. Daughter needs to see the valve stems he should be using. Heck they are only $5 for two of them on Ebay. Is his life that worthless? My wife would snap a knott in the back of my head if I tried to pull that stupid stunt.

    Sorry to rant. But there is a fix for STUPID. Death cures it every time, no relaps.
    Even this is 2 for $8 and Prime Shipping on Amazon: search for ASIN B01LW69XFK
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveJ98092 View Post
    Well, Richard, you may have something there, maybe. A 4 inch tube is inflating out to fill a 100 mm and may be having a hard time going that extra 20 mm, almost 1 inch wider.
    I think a 4.00" tube is specified for a 120 tire. Partly because metric tire sizes and inch tire sizes don't exactly translate. If it did not work then the tube would burst. It wouldn't have anything to do with the tire not properly mounting on the rim bead.
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    Anyone put anakee's or shinko 705's on their f800r? would they fit? I'm keen on finding out, they got 130/80s, and 170/60's for 17 inch rims
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