The day your bike disappears... - BMW F800 Riders Forum & Registry



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  1. #1
    flyrider's Avatar
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    No, this isn't about a bike being stolen. It's about that point in your riding history when you are no longer a rider guiding your bike through corners and going to destinations toward which you've aimed your bike. It's about the day when you're riding, after many years, and - suddenly - your bike disappears. It's the day when your mind is the vehicle, and the machine you're mounted on is the propulsion. It's the day when a thought becomes your reality and instead of the bike taking you into a corner, or to a destination, it's YOU who is taking the bike to those places. It's the day when you don't even feel you're on a bike, but that you're a disembodied spirit that can flow like water around a bend, and fly like a hawk to a far-off place. It's a revelation. It must be what riding is meant to be, because it's the greatest feeling on earth. You are no longer a passenger, you're no longer just a "rider", you're the bike...and the bike is you.

    By the way, the GT is a bike that I've grown to understand only gradually. But that understanding reached a new level today, leading to the above "commentary". I've got a RR also, and think it's a magical machine, but for some reason today I found a depth of respect for the GT that I had no idea was possible.

    Thanks for reading...
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  4. #2
    Melbourne, Australia IanA is offline F800Riders.org Supporter
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    Nice riff, FlyMan! It sounds like you have reached that transcendental state that say, a musician achieves when the instrument becomes just part of the pathway for the music from inside , or an artist wielding a brush producing a scene straight from the heart, without quite realising how..
    I am not sure I ever quite got there through motorcycling, but I feel I have sailing - an activity I believe equally abundant in tactile and consciousness rewards and where you never stop learning.
    We are so lucky to have our interests that just keep on giving. Stay Safe.
    Cheers, IanA

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    I know what you mean. When you ride and you don't think about what you're doing. You just do it. The bike and you are one.

    And the F800GT is perfect in that way. It does everything well. (Sorry, Noel. ) The GT doesn't have any idiosyncrasies. It just does everything well so it doesn't get in the way. It just adds to the enjoyment.

    Chris
    Elnathan - 2014 BMW F800GT
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    notacop is offline The original Schwartz Wald Troll
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    I know folks who talk about riding like that but they smoke a lot of weed.
    I've had glimpses of that euphoric experience before. The ST was a great device to assist in getting to that state.
    It's a bummer when you wake back up in traffic!

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    That is the way I feel when I am riding my electric motorcycle. It is has so few vibrations and is so quiet that I hardly even know it is there and being direct-drive I never have to think about what gear I am in. The power and torque are always available if I insistently need it. Of course, there are many motorcycle owners who prefer to be more engaged with their vehicle while riding.
    Richard - Current bikes: 2016 BMW R1200RS, 2018 16.6 kWh Zero S, 2011 Royal Enfield Bullet 500 Classic, 2009 BMW F650GS, 2020 KTM 390 Duke, 2002 Yamaha FZ1 (FZS1000N) and a 1978 Honda Kick 'N Go Senior. 

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    flyrider's Avatar
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    Ian - Sailing, eh? Wish I lived near you, I'd love to sail with you. I've gone with friends and being on the water is really something. Lucky you, to have that AND motorcycling! I play guitar as well, and know exactly what it means to get lost in your playing. Thanks!

    Daboo - The GT is a bike that takes time to impress you with all its nuances. At first blush, it's fairly "plain", but over time it reveals things you didn't know were there. It's like the description of how Michelangelo carved "The David"; he is reputed to have said that he didn't so much as carve the statue out of the marble, but he removed the marble that was hiding the statue within. Over time, I think I've "removed" my own mental marble from the GT and revealed its brilliance. It's a very under-appreciated bike!

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    In the summer months, I am fortunate enough to take some long day rides up to places like Artist Point on Mt. Baker where it is snowed in much of the year. And then there's trips like the one I recently made to the Badlands. But much of the year here is spent riding in the lowlands, because those upper elevation rides are covered in snow.

    But even in the winter, I get a thrill over leaning the bike over on a freeway on-ramp. Or taking one of the more curvy roads to the prison, or church...or even Costco and feeling the bike accelerate effortlessly beneath me. The rides aren't as long, but the feeling is still there.

    In a car, my mind can be somewhere else completely. On a bike, your mind is in the moment, and the GT is perfect for enhancing that feeling.

    Chris
    Elnathan - 2014 BMW F800GT
    IBA# 49894 True Rounder = 0-20's - Rounder -- to -- 100's+ Red Hot Rounder

    John 14:6 

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    Richard I understand the silent electric M/C thrill.
    I rode nothing but dirt for about 15 yrs, pretty much every weekend with 4 or 5 other crazies.
    There was a few mile downhill fire trail we would sometimes line up at the top and race to the bottom in neutral with engines off.
    Nothing like doing a big jump with just wind noise.
    07 F800 ST 

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    I had lost those days and was conscious I was losing my confidence. However things are getting back to 'normal' after its head bearings replaced, new sparking plugs and a new rear tyre. The transformation was unbelievable. I need to ride more before getting back to 'just being' rather than 'me and it' then I shall be happy and revel in the freedom of two wheels. I got that way with my CBF1000 I rode for 7 years, and the GT is beginning to be everything I want it to be.

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    It’s a great feeling. I equate it to carving turns on the slopes when the snow is perfect, your mind is in the moment, every turn is better than the last, and you feel like you could go forever.
    2013 BMW F800GT | 2015 BMW R1200RT | 2014 Honda CB1100 DLX 

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    I think my bike almost disappeared yesterday...

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    Albervin's Avatar
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    I have a friend who I call a middle aged hippy. He says that when you and your bike are as one you are Zen. I can't say I have felt that with my Beemer but certainly with my Aprilia RS250. No thought about lean angles, tyre grip etc. You look, you go. Keep looking, keep going. It is very pleasant and calming but now at my age I get tired quickly so after about an hour of this I settle back and cruise. Take in the breeze, smell the trees and cow shit and cruise.

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    flyrider's Avatar
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    Yesterday I rode the RR in the mountains. I was planning on a "short" 150-mile ride. Took a left instead of a right turn (just "because") and turned it into a 280-mile ride. I was so "in the moment", I covered 100 miles at a stretch without any awareness of the passage of time.

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    I was thinking about this thread yesterday. Look at the route on the GPS.



    And these signs say it all.







    Chris
    Elnathan - 2014 BMW F800GT
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    John 14:6 

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  30. #15
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    Oh, Daboo...that is a nice road...

  31. #16
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    " It's the day when you don't even feel you're on a bike, but that you're a disembodied spirit that can flow like water around a bend, and fly like a hawk to a far-off place.
    . . . it's the greatest feeling on earth. "

    I know that feeling bud, I get it when I ride too. It took me about 18 months to get used to being back on a bike after 40 years and get over my fear but then everything just flowed. Not that I'm a great rider, I've just got used to riding within my limits I guess. I live 30km out of town and travel exclusively by bike, both commuting and on trips around the country. ' nice to see it's not just me

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  33. #17
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    Bravo! Very well expressed. I hope I get there one of these days. I'm still at the "rider guiding my bike" stage, as I just started riding this year. You really know how to put this special thought/feeling into words. Thank you!

  34. #18
    flyrider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ZeeAviatrix View Post
    Bravo! Very well expressed. I hope I get there one of these days. I'm still at the "rider guiding my bike" stage, as I just started riding this year. You really know how to put this special thought/feeling into words. Thank you!
    Thank YOU! And from your "name", I'm guessing you're a pilot. I had my own airplane for 8 years and flew a lot...for pleasure. Interestingly, the physics of flying and riding are remarkably similar, so flying skills DO translate to riding skills, on many levels. Be interested in hearing if I'm right about you being a pilot. Thanks again...

    And since I mentioned the RR in the original post, here's a photo from a 280 mile ride in the mountains yesterday with the RR; that ride had some moments, too...like covering 100 miles in one stretch and losing all consciousness of time in the process.:
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  36. #19
    Melbourne, Australia IanA is offline F800Riders.org Supporter
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    The late Mr. Persig wrote a pretty good treatise on this topic quite some years ago. Google "Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance", you young blokes....

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    flyrider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by IanA View Post
    The late Mr. Persig wrote a pretty good treatise on this topic quite some years ago. Google "Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance", you young blokes....
    "Young blokes...". I like that. I read "Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance" in the mid-1970's, after it had just been published. Fascinating stuff. Also on my book list at that time were Carlos Castenada's books, which should tell you something about where my head was at during that time.

    I'm 73, by the way...

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  39. #21
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    While I no longer have my F800GT, I do often experience this when I ride my R nineT up and down this particular 16 mile stretch of roadway, this short clip from the way down.


    Click image for larger version. 

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    Last edited by Azgeek; 07-16-20 at 01:36 PM.
    2019 F850GS Adventure
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    2017 R nineT Scrambler 

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  41. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by flyrider View Post
    It's the day when you don't even feel you're on a bike, but that you're a disembodied spirit that can flow like water around a bend, and fly like a hawk to a far-off place. It's a revelation.
    My brother who is 72y/o and has put 750,000+ miles on motorcycles started talking like that the morning we left Sheridan WY OTW to Yellowstone in June 2016. An hour or so later, shortly after descending the lovely Big Horns on lonely road 14, he was jarred into full reality when he hit a good sized buck which totaled his new FJR1300ES He survived in good shape very thankfully.

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    I know exactly what the OP is talking about. I have been riding now for over 50 years and sometimes when I go on a trip albeit being super conscious of hazards and other users, I can arrive at the other end and not remember some parts of the ride as the functions were all carried out apparently autonomously. However, when I picked up a 50 year-old Triumph Tiger Cub that I had just bought to ride home it was so different to "normal" that I remember every inch of the journey because I had to think a lot about the bike and it's capabilities. Appalling brakes, gear lever on the other side, no power, skinny tyres, very light weight. That really focussed the mind.

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  45. #24
    flyrider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Noel View Post
    My brother who is 72y/o and has put 750,000+ miles on motorcycles started talking like that the morning we left Sheridan WY OTW to Yellowstone in June 2016. An hour or so later, shortly after descending the lovely Big Horns on lonely road 14, he was jarred into full reality when he hit a good sized buck which totaled his new FJR1300ES He survived in good shape very thankfully.
    Two things: Thanks for "ripping me back to reality"() and secondly, I used to live in Big Horn, just down the road from Sheridan. Back around 1959.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Buzzz View Post
    I think my bike almost disappeared yesterday...
    Well.... Today was the exact opposite. I rode with my wife for only 1 hour and the ride was horrible to say the least. I guess this bike disappears only when you're alone on it...

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  49. #26
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    It also depends on the passenger. Does the passenger move with you and the bike...or against?

    Plus, you have a great point. This bike doesn't weigh much. You're adding a lot of weight that you don't control, up high.

    Chris
    Elnathan - 2014 BMW F800GT
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    John 14:6 

  50. #27
    flyrider's Avatar
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    I think it has more to do with where your head is at than whether a passenger can "ride with you". I don't like riding with other people, because my mind is partly taken up with an awareness of their presence. Being "in the moment" is impossible if you're not wholly in your own head.

  51. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Daboo View Post
    It also depends on the passenger. Does the passenger move with you and the bike...or against?

    Plus, you have a great point. This bike doesn't weigh much. You're adding a lot of weight that you don't control, up high.

    Chris
    Yes, the weight ratio change is quite important. Even if my wife is only 105 lbs, the added weight is up high, and on the rear. The front wheel felt kind of "too light".

    Quote Originally Posted by flyrider View Post
    I think it has more to do with where your head is at than whether a passenger can "ride with you". I don't like riding with other people, because my mind is partly taken up with an awareness of their presence. Being "in the moment" is impossible if you're not wholly in your own head.
    You have a good point here as well. When I have a passenger with me, I always tend to try to run smoother and slower, but in the end, it's not MY pace and the ride doesn't feel as smooth as it should be and I don't feel as confident as I should feel.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Buzzz View Post
    ...in the end, it's not MY pace and the ride doesn't feel as smooth as it should be and I don't feel as confident as I should feel.
    And that's where practice will make things better.

    You'll never feel as free as when you ride solo. But what I'd give to have my wife ride with me. I really envy you for having a wife who will ride with you. You give up some things...but you gain so much more.

    Chris
    Elnathan - 2014 BMW F800GT
    IBA# 49894 True Rounder = 0-20's - Rounder -- to -- 100's+ Red Hot Rounder

    John 14:6 

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    Yes, I am a pilot, and you are correct...many of the techniques used in flying an airplane apply to riding a bike. At this point, I'm finding riding a bike to be more difficult than flying an airplane but I'm sure it's because I'm a newbie. Can't wait to get to that point that you described in this post!

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    Quote Originally Posted by ZeeAviatrix View Post
    Yes, I am a pilot, and you are correct...many of the techniques used in flying an airplane apply to riding a bike. At this point, I'm finding riding a bike to be more difficult than flying an airplane but I'm sure it's because I'm a newbie. Can't wait to get to that point that you described in this post!
    You'll get there. As in flying, improvement only comes with "seat" time...the same as "tach" time in your airplane. Situational awareness is huge, as well, and that becomes automatic as your riding miles accumulate. And...just as in flying, the key to good technique is relaxation. The physics comparison is truly apt...airplanes want to fly themselves, and bikes want to propel themselves. The more we manhandle planes and bikes, the more awkward our riding becomes. But to relax, you need hours/miles. Look forward to hearing about your progress!

    Are there specific things you're having difficulty with? I'm sure there are a number of "seasoned" riders here who can provide input/solutions to many issues newer riders encounter.
    Last edited by flyrider; 07-20-20 at 06:00 PM.

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    Riding is my Zen. I turned 74 last month. I will probably be an absolute bastard to live with when I have to give it up.

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    When I was a teenager, riding was my only reason for existence. I had a Suzuki TM125 that I rode constantly, and although I don't think it ever disappeared - we were a team and we knew exactly what each was capable of doing. I would ride several hours after school each day, on weekends and summers it was likely all day rides. We lived on a farm and I had plenty of land to ride, my best friend lived on a farm that had an abandoned strip mine - and if we got on the railroad tracks we could ride to several abandoned strip mines in the area. We raced every Sunday that we could find a track open.

    I feel extremely comfortable and at home on my F800GT, and it is a joy to ride and it suits my needs very well - however I doubt that I will ever be as close to it as I was on my little Suzuki.

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    It certainly happens in a particular time/place. I've recently come back from a trip into the Highlands on the bike and there were certainly some rides & places which become very serene - regardless of the weather. A bike moves the body and the soul. The interaction you have with a bike makes it an existential part of you, your input makes the bike respond. Unlike in a car where you do something, which tells the computer to do something which moves the thing. . . . .
    BMW F800ST, 2010, Black, Fuzeblock, Sat Nav, BMW Tank Bag, Givi Touring Screen, Spotlights, 50K Miles 

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    Quote Originally Posted by flyrider View Post
    You'll get there. As in flying, improvement only comes with "seat" time...the same as "tach" time in your airplane. Situational awareness is huge, as well, and that becomes automatic as your riding miles accumulate. And...just as in flying, the key to good technique is relaxation. The physics comparison is truly apt...airplanes want to fly themselves, and bikes want to propel themselves. The more we manhandle planes and bikes, the more awkward our riding becomes. But to relax, you need hours/miles. Look forward to hearing about your progress!

    Are there specific things you're having difficulty with? I'm sure there are a number of "seasoned" riders here who can provide input/solutions to many issues newer riders encounter.
    Hey, thanks for that reply. I've dropped my bike 4 times! The first time was in my yard, when I first got it. The back wheel actually slipped in the wet grass. The second time was bad. I was at a stop sign. As I moved forward to turn right, I turned too quickly, forgot to look up and ahead, and down the bike went...right on my foot, breaking two bones. They were non-displaced fractures, thank goodness, but the ligaments got stretched real bad and that's what taken me a long time to recover from. The third time was on my gravel driveway, again from a stop, about to turn left. I used my front brake, instead of my rear brake when I came to a stop in the gravel, and the rear started slipping and down she went. The fourth time was on a slight uphill incline, coming to a stop, and preparing to turn right. I'm not quite sure what happened that time. The last few times I've ridden my bike, I've taken my time, coming to a complete stop and thinking more about what I was doing. So, as you can see, it's the slow maneuvering that's getting me. I'm small (5'1" 105 lbs) so an F800ST seems HUGE to me. The seat and handle bars have been lowered, so that's all fine. It's like you said, I need more seat time for sure!

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    hey Zee - to be honest, your last post certainly throws up some serious scary concerns - i won't get all dad on you, but PLEASE be careful out there - you've obviously learned some things, but ,,,,,,,,,,,,,, i guess keep learning - stay safe -
    '13 F800GT
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    Quote Originally Posted by ZeeAviatrix View Post
    Hey, thanks for that reply. I've dropped my bike 4 times! The first time was in my yard, when I first got it. The back wheel actually slipped in the wet grass. The second time was bad. I was at a stop sign. As I moved forward to turn right, I turned too quickly, forgot to look up and ahead, and down the bike went...right on my foot, breaking two bones. They were non-displaced fractures, thank goodness, but the ligaments got stretched real bad and that's what taken me a long time to recover from. The third time was on my gravel driveway, again from a stop, about to turn left. I used my front brake, instead of my rear brake when I came to a stop in the gravel, and the rear started slipping and down she went. The fourth time was on a slight uphill incline, coming to a stop, and preparing to turn right. I'm not quite sure what happened that time. The last few times I've ridden my bike, I've taken my time, coming to a complete stop and thinking more about what I was doing. So, as you can see, it's the slow maneuvering that's getting me. I'm small (5'1" 105 lbs) so an F800ST seems HUGE to me. The seat and handle bars have been lowered, so that's all fine. It's like you said, I need more seat time for sure!
    All of those incidents point to a lack of preparation leading to all the incidents. If you are struggling with any aspects of biking i'd recommend either training yourself (lots of useful videos on YT) or sourcing someone local to help with training. Use a day off to go and train yourself in low speed manoeuvres, whether it be riding round town, filtering through traffic or simply practicing in a parking lot. Learning to control the bike & weight at low speed takes more skill as you have to be prepared and know what action(s) will result in.

    I'm sorry if my post reads a bit harsh, it is meant to be light hearted and helpful.
    BMW F800ST, 2010, Black, Fuzeblock, Sat Nav, BMW Tank Bag, Givi Touring Screen, Spotlights, 50K Miles 

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    For a 5'1" rider, the ST is a bit on the tall side...and it's not a lightweight bike. Years ago, when I took a motorcycle safety course, we were given a choice of riding their bikes or our own. Several guys showed up with their Harley's and rode them. I chose the course's bike...a Suzuki 125. I passed with flying colors, but the guys with the bigger bikes could not do the obstacle course to save their lives.

    We all have probably dropped a bike at least once, so I wouldn't be too critical here. If I were Zee, I'd think about a bike with less reach to the ground, and lighter weight. Maybe even a BMW 310R...unless a big bike with touring capability is the goal. But for any rider just starting out, a smaller bike is always a good idea.

    BMW F800ST seat height: 33"
    BMW G310R seat height: 30.9"
    Last edited by flyrider; 07-27-20 at 05:32 PM.

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    Thank you, Elizdad, just saw your post. I appreciate the concern, for sure. And, no worries, I am glad to get counsel and advice from you all! I opted to get a lighter bike to learn on and practice slow maneuvering, as that has been my problem. I am careful and I'm learning lots. I'd rather make a mistake at a slow speed or dead stop than at high speeds, for obvious reasons. Thank you!
    Last edited by ZeeAviatrix; 08-03-20 at 09:06 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DJ123 View Post
    All of those incidents point to a lack of preparation leading to all the incidents. If you are struggling with any aspects of biking i'd recommend either training yourself (lots of useful videos on YT) or sourcing someone local to help with training. Use a day off to go and train yourself in low speed manoeuvres, whether it be riding round town, filtering through traffic or simply practicing in a parking lot. Learning to control the bike & weight at low speed takes more skill as you have to be prepared and know what action(s) will result in.

    I'm sorry if my post reads a bit harsh, it is meant to be light hearted and helpful.
    Not harsh at all, DJ123! Thanks for the advice! As posted to someone else, I did opt to get a lighter bike (taking someone's suggestion), to practice on and gain confidence. Believe me, I've watch a ton of videos on YouTube. They are so helpful. I've learned to filter out the goofy guys and select the Pros that give really good advice. And yes, practicing in a parking lot is something I have been doing. I appreciate the tips!

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    I'm always nervous about recommending someone practice in a parking lot. I guess it is because I know myself. I wouldn't let well enough alone, so I'd start with large circles and once I got confident, I'd go to tighter circles, then even tighter circles, and then even still tighter circles...till I got to the point that I dropped the bike.

    I practice my turning when I get the mail. Depending on the direction, I have to make a U-turn in the street. It's heavily cambered and the driveway has a large hump to get over and then goes steeply downhill. I review in my head the basics, and then try to follow through. It's enough for me.

    When I went to Baker Lake the other day, the group went down a road and had to make a U-turn. It was sloping pavement and on gravel. Two of the riders did a good job of making the U-turn. Two of us decided to play it safe and took the turn in two parts, letting the bike roll backwards a few feet to get less of a turn on the steering in the gravel. It doesn't bother me, and I would rather play it safe. If needed, I'd even get off the bike and push it, if I didn't feel comfortable. I have nothing to prove to anyone.

    Lane positioning is a skill that doesn't get the attention it deserves. I don't have "close calls". I've hit my brakes hard maybe 6 or 7 times in the last 14 years and 160,000 miles of commuting in Seattle. And two of those were for the GEICO squirrel and Bambi's auntie a few minutes later. My last "accident" was in England 39 years ago, and I brushed myself off and continued on home.

    Once you get above parking lot speeds, there is a whole different skill set that will keep you alive.

    Have you taken a rider training course? When I took the Advanced Rider Course, they spotted things that I had no idea I was doing. And that was in the first 15 minutes.

    Chris
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    Quote Originally Posted by Daboo View Post
    I'm always nervous about recommending someone practice in a parking lot. I guess it is because I know myself. I wouldn't let well enough alone, so I'd start with large circles and once I got confident, I'd go to tighter circles, then even tighter circles, and then even still tighter circles...till I got to the point that I dropped the bike.

    I practice my turning when I get the mail. Depending on the direction, I have to make a U-turn in the street. It's heavily cambered and the driveway has a large hump to get over and then goes steeply downhill. I review in my head the basics, and then try to follow through. It's enough for me.

    When I went to Baker Lake the other day, the group went down a road and had to make a U-turn. It was sloping pavement and on gravel. Two of the riders did a good job of making the U-turn. Two of us decided to play it safe and took the turn in two parts, letting the bike roll backwards a few feet to get less of a turn on the steering in the gravel. It doesn't bother me, and I would rather play it safe. If needed, I'd even get off the bike and push it, if I didn't feel comfortable. I have nothing to prove to anyone.

    Lane positioning is a skill that doesn't get the attention it deserves. I don't have "close calls". I've hit my brakes hard maybe 6 or 7 times in the last 14 years and 160,000 miles of commuting in Seattle. And two of those were for the GEICO squirrel and Bambi's auntie a few minutes later. My last "accident" was in England 39 years ago, and I brushed myself off and continued on home.

    Once you get above parking lot speeds, there is a whole different skill set that will keep you alive.

    Have you taken a rider training course? When I took the Advanced Rider Course, they spotted things that I had no idea I was doing. And that was in the first 15 minutes.

    Chris
    Hey, Daboo,

    Thanks for your thoughts and telling us about your experience. I signed up for MSF's basic course back in February but because of Covid-19 it keeps getting cancelled. Here we are August and I still haven't been able to take it. I'll try the "circles" idea.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ZeeAviatrix View Post
    Hey, Daboo,

    Thanks for your thoughts and telling us about your experience. I signed up for MSF's basic course back in February but because of Covid-19 it keeps getting cancelled. Here we are August and I still haven't been able to take it. I'll try the "circles" idea.
    Ugh! Don't try the "circles" idea! Or at least be smarter than me and don't keep trying to get better and better till you drop the bike.

    You'll find YouTube videos on riders that look really proficient...and they are. The motorcycle cops spend hours and hours practicing. What you don't see is the times they dropped the bike and the police department had to fix it. $$$$ That could be you.

    Chris
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    Sophie, try checking out from the library a book by David Hough, Proficient Motorcycling.

    Here's an article on cornering by David Hough. It's part 1 with a link to part 2 at the end. https://soundrider.com/archive/safet...ls/RS-cc1.aspx

    Here's an article on lane positioning. I can quickly tell a newbie rider by where they ride. A quick example would be that they hide along the side of the road in the HOV lane where they can't be seen. Then they wonder why a car tries to move into their space.
    http://www.motorcyclebasics.com/lane-position.html

    Chris
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    i know this is going a bit off topic, but could someone explain why slow speed maneuvering is vital to staying alive out in the real world - not trying to be a jerk , but it just doesn't rank very high on my list -
    '13 F800GT
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elizdad View Post
    i know this is going a bit off topic, but could someone explain why slow speed maneuvering is vital to staying alive out in the real world - not trying to be a jerk , but it just doesn't rank very high on my list -
    I'm not sure it IS vital in the real world, except that if you can maneuver a bike at low speed it says something about your understanding of motorcycle physics, which IS vital in the real world. One thing that always blows my mind is how "counter-steering" can be difficult for people to grasp...we all do it automatically, yet it's apparently a big mystery to many.

    Pretty good slow-speed maneuvering video:

    https://youtu.be/m0omPQjkcSY
    Last edited by flyrider; 08-04-20 at 12:31 PM.

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    On some of the roads I ride, slow speed manoeuvring on almost full lock is essential to get around hairpin bends, especially when they are on the side of a mountain!
    Reading some threads of US riders who 'regularly' cover 1000 miles in day makes the contrast between UK and USA riding very obvious!

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    First, my GT disappeared...then today my RR disappeared. What a phenomenal ride. Late day, absolutely transparent air...hills, mountains in bold relief, and the river sparkling with late-day sun diamonds. Cornering was like a perfect day skiing...every turn carved the way a surgeon performs in the OR. Even better...the weekend traffic had disappeared as well, so that all the way up-canyon I had clear road...and the same, for the most part, on the way down. It was one of those rides you remember long after it's done.

    I hope I dream about this ride tonight...

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  82. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Daboo View Post
    Ugh! Don't try the "circles" idea! Or at least be smarter than me and don't keep trying to get better and better till you drop the bike.

    You'll find YouTube videos on riders that look really proficient...and they are. The motorcycle cops spend hours and hours practicing. What you don't see is the times they dropped the bike and the police department had to fix it. $$$$ That could be you.

    Chris
    Thanks, Chris. YouTube is great. I like Jerry Palladino in his Ride Like a Pro videos...I bought his book, too. Practicing in a parking lot (when there's no one around) helps with developing skills for slow speed maneuvering. When you are surrounded by people, such as at a gas station, you're more self-conscious about making a mistake and tense up. As Flyrider posted earlier, it's important for me (at this stage of my development) to stay relaxed and remember to look up and in the direction I'm going. Figure 8s or slow speed racing are very helpful. Maybe not super tight circles, lol! I wish I had started out on a smaller, lighter bike like the one I recently acquired rather than on the F800ST. I wouldn't have had the unpleasant experience of dropping my bike, probably. Oh well, live and learn!

  83. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by Daboo View Post
    Sophie, try checking out from the library a book by David Hough, Proficient Motorcycling.

    Here's an article on cornering by David Hough. It's part 1 with a link to part 2 at the end. https://soundrider.com/archive/safet...ls/RS-cc1.aspx

    Here's an article on lane positioning. I can quickly tell a newbie rider by where they ride. A quick example would be that they hide along the side of the road in the HOV lane where they can't be seen. Then they wonder why a car tries to move into their space.
    http://www.motorcyclebasics.com/lane-position.html

    Chris
    Awesome! I will check it out. Thank you!

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