Gas grade in Canada - BMW F800 Riders Forum & Registry



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  1. #1
    Lag's Avatar
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    What octane grade are you guys using for your, 798GS engines in Canada,,. A friend just pointed out that there is a very confusing grading difference between the fuel sold in the 2 countries and he believes that he should be running the high grade option in his F800GS,,. I've always ran mid grade and sometimes the low grade in my F700GS, never noticed any performance differences one way or another, could there be a difference in the two bikes?

    Chevron, locally sells 87,89 91 & 94 octane's,,.

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  3. #2
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    Only 94 here in Ottawa. I usually don’t care about this stuff with my cars as they can compensate much better with varying fuel grades. I have had poor performance with lower grade fuels in my GS. Never had issues with higher octane level fuels. I think the motor just likes it better.

    Just my experience.

  4. #3
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    Around Montreal it’s mostly the usual 3 grades everywhere with only a few that will offer 94.
    I can only speak experience on my 2007ST though. I used to fill up with 91 then this one time I had to fill up with regular 87 that I had in the garage for my garden tractor. I just couldn’t notice any difference.

    Since then I only ran on 87 the only real difference I’ve noticed is a marginal higher fuel consumption (from the reduce mileage I get)
    But overall it’s less than 5%. And I don’t drive my bike hard enough to notice if the engine lost power.

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  6. #4
    Lag's Avatar
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    I use the 94 octane for storage,,,,,,,, the Chevron 94 is ethanol free,,,.
    I usually use the mid grade 89 but sometimes have used the 87 and frankly cant notice the deference with any of them,,.
    Friend with an 800gs says you need to use the 91 according to the book,,.

    Manual recommended ?
    Super Unleaded max 10% ethanol e10
    95 ROZ/RON
    87 AKI

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  8. #5
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    Octane ratings are measures of fuel stability (premature detonation, aka "knocking".)

    An octane rating is essentially the measurement of a fuel's ability to avoid engine knock.

    A higher octane level will prevent premature ignition and knocking.

    A common misunderstanding is that higher octane relates to higher power. Octane measurements have no relationship with energy content.
    Concrete remains undefeated. 

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  10. #6
    Lag's Avatar
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    I know I can get away with mid grade in Canada on 1000 Ninja, but when I tried it in US it pings,,. Never heard it ping on CAD fuel,,.

  11. #7
    Closterman's Avatar
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    Interesting article that might explain the difference between BC gas and Washington State gas
    https://www.theglobeandmail.com/amp/...ticle13224927/

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  13. #8
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    Yes I know octane and power are unrelated. But my owner’s manual states: 91ROZ/RON, Regular unleaded (fuel type can be used with reduced performance and consumption).

    So maybe «*reduced performance*» mean something else than power output?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Closterman View Post
    Yes I know octane and power are unrelated. But my owner’s manual states: 91ROZ/RON, Regular unleaded (fuel type can be used with reduced performance and consumption).

    So maybe «*reduced performance*» mean something else than power output?
    It could indeed. There are other variables that come into play, as James writes.

    The additives that increase octane take the place of the good stuff that has a better ability to expel energy faster. (Makes you go fast, faster. )
    Last edited by Runmyownlife; 1 Week Ago at 11:56 PM.
    Concrete remains undefeated. 

  15. #10
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    The F800 engine has a 12:1 compression ratio. If it was a carbureted engine of forty years ago, it would need 105 octane leaded aviation fuel to run without damaging preignition. With a modern computerized engine fuel/ignition management system, the engine will run on 87 octane regular grade fuel. However, the computer will make adjustments to counter preignition. There will be a loss of maximum power and efficiency. It may not be noticeable to the rider, because riders seldom use maximum power. With 87 octane gas, the bike may require a bit more throttle to achieve the same level of speed and acceleration, but unless it is full throttle, it would not likely be noticed.

    For a bike that gets 60+ mpg, I prefer to use the highest available octane, generally around here that would be 91. Also, I believe it to be worth the expense to buy the top tier brands like Chevron or Shell because of the additives these brands contain, which are not found in cheap gas. The manual for my newish (2019) car recommends buying the top tier fuel at least every three or four fill-ups. The top tier fuel additives are protective of the various sensors required for the electronic fuel management and the fuel injection systems. Saving a few bucks a year buying cheap gas goes away rather quickly when a sensor or injector fails.

    If one is still driving Dad's '85 Oldsmobile, none of this applies.

    James Sadilek -- ccwatchmaker
    In the garage: 1972 BMW R60/5 - 1983 Yamaha XJ650 Maxim - 2014 F800 GT
     

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  17. #11
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    My 2009 F650GS was designed by BMW to run on 87 octane fuel. But then it also is designed not to make as much power as the other F800 engines.

    My understanding is that in California, the amount of fuel cleaners and additives in gasoline (or diesel for that matter) are regulated by the state's Air Resources Board and are supposed to work just as well if you are buying a name brand of fuel or the leftover stuff from the same refinery, which is sold in much cheaper stations like Costco, Safeway or Rotten Robbie. So in California at least, I wouldn't be too worried about using the cheapest fuel that you can find - unless you are buying it from a roadside stand out of a 55-gallon drum.
    Richard - Current bikes: 2016 BMW R1200RS, 2018 16.6 kWh Zero S, 2011 Royal Enfield Bullet 500 Classic, 2009 BMW F650GS, 2020 KTM 390 Duke, 2002 Yamaha FZ1 (FZS1000N) and a 1978 Honda Kick 'N Go Senior. 

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