Tire/Tyre Plug - BMW F800 Riders Forum & Registry



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  1. #1
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    Hi

    After changing my oil yesterday I noticed my rear tyre was flat. Upon inspection I found a broken saw blade sticking out. It was stuck in one of the tyre grooves so it the thinner part of the tyre. I removed the piece of metal and plugged the hole. My question is due to it being in the weaker part of the tyre would you replace it. Tyre has only done about 300miles.

    Pick of my tyre post plugging
    Click image for larger version. 

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  3. #2
    Dalesman's Avatar
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    Always a tough one. On a car I'd say run with it. There's a lot more at stake if you have a high speed blow out on a bike. Despite the annoying cost when you've already spent good money on a new tyre I would be inclined to replace. But then I do tend to be a bit over-cautious...

  4. #3
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    Most punctures occur in the grooves, i.e. thinner part of tyre, so I don't think location is an issue (if within the centre 50% of tyre)

    If it was a nail/screw I'd be inclined to run with it. However, a blade may have cut several underlying cords, weakening the tyre construction. Think I'd replace the tyre

    To be sure take it to a tyre repair shop you trust They'll repair it safe to do so. Last one cost me around £25
    Ajay

    F800GT 2018 

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  6. #4
    Bogbody's Avatar
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    Get it checked and repaired professonaly.
    The object may have damaged the tyre structure.
    Any roadside repair should be checked by a professional. Its vital to check the tyre carcase on the inside for damage.
    I lost a tyre that way some years ago due to vandalism.
    F800GT in blue known as "The Blue Bat"
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  7. #5
    Richard230's Avatar
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    I don't think there is anyway to make a tread repair for a thin cut like that. You could try putting Slime, or a similar product, into the tire. If it doesn't work all it will do is to start slowly leaking out of the cut and that might be an indication that you need to replace the tire. I have cut up a bunch of old tires with a hack saw over the years to get the tire in my garbage can as my city's recycling yard will not take motorcycle tires. I can tell you that tire carcasses are very tough and it is a lot of work to cut through the cords. Personally, I doubt that that any damage that the piece of blade did to the tire cords is going to result in a blowout. But you are the rider and it is your decision what to do next.
    Richard - Current bikes: 2016 BMW R1200RS, 2018 16.6 kWh Zero S, 2011 Royal Enfield Bullet 500 Classic, 2009 BMW F650GS, 2020 KTM 390 Duke, 2002 Yamaha FZ1 (FZS1000N) and a 1978 Honda Kick 'N Go Senior. 

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  9. #6
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    The question you are asking has more to do with your risk tolerance than your repair.

    Slow leak, low speed is vastly different then high speed, rapid discharge.

    Most, not all, of what you have shared with us suggest slow leak. The remaining calculus is up to you.
    Concrete remains undefeated. 

  10. #7
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    Thanks for all the responses. I have actually repaired it hence you can see the plug and took it on a ride and it did not lose any pressure. I will check again today but as stated I will probably replace it as it will be in back of my mind. I have reapired two previous tyres like this with no problem though it was on the face rather than in the groove

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    At least with the tyre off you can check if there is any further damage, and potentially get it repaired properly and have it as a 'back up' tyre. at home.
    BMW F800ST, 2010, Black, Fuzeblock, Sat Nav, BMW Tank Bag, Givi Touring Screen, Denali Spotlights, Denali CANSmart, Wunderlich Crash Bars, 55K Miles & counting 

  12. #9
    Richard230's Avatar
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    If you have already plugged the hole, don't put any Slime in your tire. If you do that might make the plug come out due to the product acting like a lube. And if that happens, your tire will deflate quickly.
    Richard - Current bikes: 2016 BMW R1200RS, 2018 16.6 kWh Zero S, 2011 Royal Enfield Bullet 500 Classic, 2009 BMW F650GS, 2020 KTM 390 Duke, 2002 Yamaha FZ1 (FZS1000N) and a 1978 Honda Kick 'N Go Senior. 

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    No “professional” will repair a motorcycle tire. They have successfully promoted a narrative of F.U.D. that somehow a failed repair is more dangerous than the original puncture. They like this narrative because who wouldn’t rather sell a new tire for $300 than repair for $50?

    I agree having plugged 5-6 motorcycle tires the last 5 years that I would plug that one to get home, then replace. No plug kit recommends plugging punctures larger than 1/4”. Guessing a broken saw blade is wider than that.

    Recently a friend got a shard of glass through a tire. Plugged. Got home. Slow leak. I replaced the tire for him but still considered an inside patch to reuse. Found the glass shard floating inside the tire. About 5/16”. Knowing this guy liked to burst to 100 MPH on occasion I talked him into throwing it on the dump pile. I feared this one might rip.

    Personally had a Metzeler Z6 rear puncture. Two very small holes 1/2” apart. Guessing a staple. I felt the tire tear as I inserted the plugs. Didn’t hold air well. Finally doubled the plugs for 4 strings in each hole. Got home losing air. Threw the tire away.

    If you do not already have, buy a TPMS system. If your repair fails it will probably fail slow. With TPMS you can see it before you feel it.
    2016 Yamaha FJR1300A; 2016 Beta 430RS; 2007 BMW F800S; 2009 Husaberg FE450; 2016 Subaru Outback; 2018 F150; 2013 Tesla Model S 85; 1983 Porsche 928S; 9 cats 

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  16. #11
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    No problem getting a professional repair in the UK.
    Exceptions -
    One repair per tyre
    Not near or in the sidewall
    F800GT in blue known as "The Blue Bat"
    Based near Peterborough, Cambridge, UK 

  17. #12
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    In my area of California no motorcycle shop that I know of will repair a motorcycle tire. I assume it has to do with a requirement from their liability insurance company who doesn't want to have to defend a lawsuit from a rider on a motorcycle with a repaired tire that crashes. Plus, as you know, motorcycle tire manufacturers warn their customers not to plug a tire except in an emergency and then only for a slow ride home. After arriving home buy a new tire and have your dealer install it. It wasn't always that way, but it is now. Interestingly, auto repair shops will happily repair a holed tire with a plug and patch inserted from inside the tire.

    All I can say is that I have been plugging motorcycle tires with good results for the past 30 years, or so, ever since tubeless tires and cast wheels came on the market during the 1980's. I will (and currently am) ride a plugged tire to the end of its life and have yet to have a bad experience doing so.
    Richard - Current bikes: 2016 BMW R1200RS, 2018 16.6 kWh Zero S, 2011 Royal Enfield Bullet 500 Classic, 2009 BMW F650GS, 2020 KTM 390 Duke, 2002 Yamaha FZ1 (FZS1000N) and a 1978 Honda Kick 'N Go Senior. 

  18. #13
    Lag's Avatar
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    I've been going through the same scenario, had brand new set of Anakee Adventure tires last season, within 1000 kms I put a pcs of shale rock shaped like an arrow head between the tread blocks in the thin center wall part of the tire,,. Ended up with a 5/8s inch cut in the opposite direction the tire runs,,. No one in these parts will touch a motorcycle tire for repair, so I replaced it with a brand new tire only to put a nail through that tire within 2500 kms,,. Both tires held air with plugs,,.

    What Ive done is put a 3"x1.5" car tire patch on the 1K tire with the shale cut, remounted it and have ran it for 1500KM without any loss of air,,. This repaired tire has been used quite a lot on the off road and spun hard in rocky uphill terrain, both small rocks and heavy 4 inch river rock, also sustained cornering at hwy speeds & faster and it hasn't lost an ounce of air, (bike has tpms),. Evan though this tire is performing well I'm not really comfortable being the crash test dummy so I have decided to plug patch the 2500Km nail in the tire and switch this one out for the garbage in spite of its good performance,,. Just waiting for the plug patches to arrive, which I couldn't purchase any locally,,.

    Apparently an integrated plug patch is the only repair that is "considered permanent", individual patches or individual plugs are only "considered temporary" repairs, so thats what my latest rule of thumb is,. Do your own diligence,,!!
    Last edited by Lag; 04-25-21 at 12:12 PM.

  19. #14
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    I think a saw blade made too large a hole for this tire to be salvageable.

    When I was a Michelin automobile tire dealer their guidance was not to repair a hole larger than 1/4" and only in the tread area, never the shoulder or sidewall. That was in the '70's to '90's before liability was as much of a concern. We always dismounted the tire and did a plug from the inside to protect the cords and belts and a patch on the inside to hold the air.
    I have always used the same guidelines to repair a motorcycle tire, never relying on an exterior plug as a permanent repair. I think that was good advice and it has worked well for me for a long time. LOL, I hope I didn't offend any lawyers.

    Harry

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  21. #15
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    Yep, The saw blade was quite small. It was the top scetion of a jigsaw, The actual piece was about 4mmx3mm so very small and the whole it made was smaller. Safety being main concern especially on two wheels it makes total sense for me to replace it.

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  23. #16
    anjelli's Avatar
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    Ryan's thoughts on tire repairs:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qm6fTWaj3QE

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  25. #17
    Lag's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by anjelli View Post
    Ryan's thoughts on tire repairs:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qm6fTWaj3QE
    Thought the result on Ryan's plug patch test was quite convincing over the other three types of patches,,. I've ordered a supply and intend on running with them, the obvious drawback is that the tire needs to be removed however the alternative is IMO replacing the tire which also involves re&re,,!!

  26. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lag View Post
    Thought the result on Ryan's plug patch test was quite convincing over the other three types of patches,,. I've ordered a supply and intend on running with them, the obvious drawback is that the tire needs to be removed however the alternative is IMO replacing the tire which also involves re&re,,!!
    I have installed many plug patches in motorcycle tires. There are several sizes available for bigger or smaller holes. Better results can be had by grinding down the little cross hatch lines inside around the patch area. One addition I do is to coat the patch inside with liner sealer. Just some added assurance against any leakage. Here's the one I use. https://shop.advanceautoparts.com/p/...E&gclsrc=aw.ds

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