Beat the Heat! - BMW F800 Riders Forum & Registry



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  1. #1
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    I bought a used Puig windscreen from a forum member......and it works great for reducing the amount of wind noise. The stock windscreen puts a lot of air at my neck, and the wind noise is excessive at speeds over 60mph. The Puig works great at raising the wind from the top of the screen up to the brow of my helmet (I am 5'-8" tall). With a Puig deflector added at the top I can adjust it to move the wind even higher and it almost completely eliminates the offensive wind noise!



    However - just as I have experienced in the past with other larger windscreens, the heat coming from the engine up to my legs is increased dramatically. We have had several days last week with the temps above 90 degrees, and the amount of heat was not a welcome change.

    So....I decided to try cutting some vents in the windscreen to reduce the low pressure area behind the windscreen. I also did not like the way the bottom and edges of the windscreen would light up at night....the bottom of the Puig extended about 1/4' down into the headlight.

    I have included photos of how the windscreen lights up at night......I find it very distracting.

    The photo of the windscreen with the green tape shows how I was going to raise the bottom edge, and then an approximation of the vents I was going to cut. The vents would roughly follow the outline of a molded wave in the windscreen that sort of replicated the vent areas in the stock screen - but there was no plastic removed.

    I also showed the tools I used. The bench belt sander was used to trim the bottom of the windscreen - I stated with 40 grit and finished up with 120 grit. Then I used a fine sandpaper foam block to polish the edge. For the vents I used an electric die grinder with a carbide bit. I ended up cutting a far different shape than the area I had taped off......I kept cutting and then holding it up to the bike to see what looked right.

    The end result is very promising! It did reduce the amount of heat I was getting a small amount, and when I take my hand and hold it up by the instrument cluster I can feel the air blowing in behind the screen. Once you move your hand a few inches back from the instruments I could not feel a breeze from the vents. I can enlarge the vents and get even more flow - I wanted to start small and see if the vents worked......I have not noticed any reduction in the strength of the windscreen.
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  4. #2
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    Now to find the source of the heat!

    When I was riding with the new windscreen vents, I rode without wearing gloves. I did this so I might be able to feel the wind blowing in through the new vents. As I was riding and I felt the heat coming up from the left side of the bike, I reached down to feel where it was coming from. I could put my fingers into the vents up high - and there was very little heat. I put my hand inside the vent that comes from the radiator, and there was very little heat. When I put my hand near the slot where there is a gap between the frame and black portion of the bodywork - there was a lot of heat. This was contrary to where I thought the heat was coming from....I though it was coming from the little triangular vent near my thigh - but it wasn't!

    So.....I stuffed a couple of socks in the gaps and went for a ride - and I noticed a reduction in the heat and it was considerably less! It was 75 degrees today - so I guess I will have to wait and see what kind of a change it makes when it is 90 degrees out......but I would appreciate a few of you guys trying this and see if you have the same result (using a black sock helps disguise the crappy appearance to the general public).

    Attachment 373885

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  6. #3
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    So....when I was back home I started to look at the bodywork, shrouding, radiator, exhaust system, etc.

    It appears that there is a path for air to enter above the radiator, and on the left side the snorkel for the filter box is located in this area. The air that enters above the radiator comes out of the bodywork at the two vents located high on the bodywork.....one of these vents is the one at thigh level.

    The air that comes through the radiator exists at the two large openings on either side of the bike.....forward of your knees. On my 75 degree ride today I could feel a lot of air coming out - but it was not hot.

    Finally it appears that the air entering under the radiator blows across the front of the engine (including the exhaust headers). This appears to be the air that is getting really hot and exiting between the frame and bodywork. On the left side you can peer through the gap and see the pavement - on the right side there is a lot of radiator hoses and other things blocking the sight.

    I also noticed that on the left side the bodywork is very tight to the engine and doesn't have a very large opening for the hot air to exit.


    On the right side the opening is far larger, and the hot air can exit much easier.


    So at this point I am beginning to believe the air that is heating up our thighs is not from the radiator - it is heat from the exhaust system and engine block. The left side is hotter as a result of the air not being able to exit the bottom bodywork as easily as the right side. So far it appears that closing up the gap between the bodywork and frame may be able to reduce the amount of heat significantly - later on I will explore how I am going to do this without using an old sock! Testing on a hot day will likely be more revealing than the ride I took today......the temperatures were really pleasant today!
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    Last edited by Thumpin; 08-01-21 at 04:50 AM.

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  9. #4
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    Some really useful research and observation Thumpin. It's certainly got me thinking about bodywork adaptations and potential mods to my Givi tall screen. Keep us posted about potential bodywork solutions!

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    You might wish to purchase one of the infrared thermometers from Harbor Freight. They are in the low $20's for cost.

    I've tried exploring where the heat comes from on the long straight stretches of the western USA. I can feel it coming from one side or the other, and always on the downwind side where there's a crosswind. It's never been an issue with me while wearing my Olympia XMoto pants that are pretty heavy.

    But an interesting thing I've noticed, is when I stop the bike and parked in the garage, is the amount of heat coming from the frame. I'm going from memory from last summer now, but I think the temperature was reaching 180F on the frame in places.

    I'm not sure what can be done though. You have a design where the engine is part of the stressed frame. It's only logical it will transfer some of that heat to the rest of the frame. Your solution to mix in more ambient temperature air is on the right track.

    FWIW, I wore a new pair of riding pants the other day from HWK. They are much lighter in the thickness of the material...and I could feel the difference in the heat. I just moved my legs out a bit more and all was well.

    Chris
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    Your initial position of air vents looks as if it would seriously weaken your screen, but the actual cut-outs look better so far as its strength.

  12. #7
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    My efforts to limit the heat seem to be successful.....it was 57 degrees when I got up this morning, and we aren't forecast to have another 90 degree day for a week!

    I agree that the heat seems to wander left/right based on which side the cross wind is coming from - however it does seem to favor the left side and comes from that side more often...and seems hotter than the right side. I believe that is because the air has an easier of time getting through the bodywork on the left side.....you can look into the gap between the bodywork and frame on the left side and see the pavement - you can't do that on the right as there is a lot of stuff in the way. The left side also has a smaller area at the back of the bodywork for the air to get out....and I believe this causes more air to be forced out the gap between the frame and bodywork where your thigh is located. I will be working on a simple and non-invasive way to get the air deflected away from this gap.....or to get the gap sealed.

  13. #8
    Daboo's Avatar
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    Another thought. Try pulling up to a store front window where you can see yourself from the side and look to where your leg is in relation to the fairing and frame.
    Elnathan - 2014 BMW F800GT
    IBA# 49894 True Rounder = 0-20's - Rounder -- to -- 100's+ Red Hot Rounder

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  14. #9
    notacop is offline The original Schwartz Wald Troll
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    To avoid the engine heat I wore motorcycle intended gear rather than nylon cargo pants or jeans. With BMW pants or Aerostich stuff the heat isn't a problem.

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    I understand that clothing can help with the heat tolerance - however I am hoping the heat can be reduced significantly. Most of my motorcycles were dirt, enduro, dual sport or standard styled bikes and they didn't make much heat while in motion. I have not owned a lot of motorcycles with bodywork (ST1100, NT700, EX250, R1200RT) - but this F800 pumps out more heat than any of those bikes.

    The air management of the left and right sides is just a little bit different.....and it appears that the left side is not controlling the air flow as well as the right. I do believe that some minor work to channel the heat away from the gap at the frame will not be very difficult to accomplish. (It may be as simple as using double sided mounting tape on the bottom of the frame to attach a deflector to send the hot air away from the gap).

    I really like the F8000GT and I believe the taller windscreen and vent additions have been an improvement in the comfort - and if I can reduce the heat I will like the bike even more!

    I just noticed the right side bodywork has an extra vent.....likely this is there to help carry away the heat from the header pipes.
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  16. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by notacop View Post
    To avoid the engine heat I wore motorcycle intended gear rather than nylon cargo pants or jeans. With BMW pants or Aerostich stuff the heat isn't a problem.
    I always wear full motorcycle fabric gear and find, even in this country, but my knee grips the tank over the left hand vent and it gets hot!!!! (nice in the winter....) Hence my role of silver Gaffa tape when it is hot.

  17. #12
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    Well I have not been able to ride much since starting this thread - so there has not been much progress.

    I was able to ride to the office for a meeting tonight - it was just into the 80's and I went the long way and only got about 15 miles on the way.

    I always wear leather gloves when I ride - but I left them off so I could feel around and see what is getting hot. Once things warmed up and I started to feel heat coming from the left side, I started moving my hands around to see what was warm, and what was hot. The black bodywork that meets the frame at thigh level got hot on the left side....it was merely warm on the right side (and the air coming out of the gap was hot on the left and warm on the right). The frame appeared to be about the same temperature on either side.....I could hold my hand on the frame without getting too hot on this short ride on an 80 degree day. I stuck my fingers into all the little vents and none of them were blowing out hot air, and even the big vents where the radiator air come out were barely above the normal air temperature.

    On the way home the temperature had dropped into the 70's and the amount of heat was not objectionable - and when I got up to a steady 60mph even the left side bodywork cooled down.

    I still haven't got the source of the heat identified yet, or figured out why the left side is prone to being hotter than the right side. The hot water from the engine goes into the radiator on the top half of the right side of the radiator and crosses from right to left, then drops down and returns along the bottom half to the right side exit.....this water path should not make the left side warmer, and the exit air from the radiator vent never feels hot.

    I do have an infrared thermometer that I use for powder coating - next warm day I will go out and take some temperature readings just to quantify what is going on in the left vs. right heat differential. I won't be able to take air temperatures with this thermometer - it only works for surface temperatures.

  18. #13
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    I was able to got for a long ride last night and I had the Infra-Red thermometer in my left pocket. When traffic allowed me to do so safely - I could use my left hand to take temperatures while riding. I could not do this while I was riding in traffic or at traffic lights.

    The temperature when I started riding was 81 degrees, and the sky was overcast.....it was a great evening to ride!

    I left the "socks" out of the gaps in the bodywork, and for the first 10 minutes of riding I was on a 4 lane road at 60mph. There was no noticeable heat of any kind as I started my ride and the bike was warming up. I first rode on a section of roadway with traffic lights every 1/4 mile and I got caught in a bit of traffic - the speed limit is 40 mph when traffic was moving. At the 15 minute mark I made a temperature check. The top of the black bodywork between the frame and painted bodywork was 119 degrees on the left side and 102 degrees on the right side - the frame was 112 on the left and 111 on the right.

    At the end of the section with traffic lights I got onto a 65 - 70mph highway, and initially the amount of heat was noticeable (traffic was too erratic to allow me to use the thermometer with my left hand) - but the amount of heat I could feel on my left leg dropped significantly once the 70mph air had a chance to cool things down. I could feel my left thigh was just getting just a small amount more heat than my right side - but the ride was very pleasant and not at all objectionable. After riding about 20 minutes at this speed the left side bodywork was 116 degrees, the right side was 93 degrees, and the left frame was 117 and the right frame was 116.

    On the way home the air temperature had dropped and I took back roads and the temperature started out at 75 and occasionally dropped down below 70 as I got closer to the Ohio river. I had put the socks back into the gaps between the body and the frame, and at no point did I ever notice any heat on my thighs. After about 20 minutes I did remove the socks from the frame gap, and after about 5 minutes I could feel a slight amount of warmth on my left leg - but at the air temperatures and nearly constant 50 mph speeds it was barely noticeable. I stopped and reinstalled the socks, and the rest of the hour ride home I never once felt any heat.

    I believe the air temperature needs to be up around 90 before the temperature becomes objectionable for my bike, and larger windshields seem to increase the amount of heat significantly. I do believe the holes I cut in my Puig have helped - I can tape over them and see if it makes a difference. We are supposed to be up around 90 degrees on Sunday and I can repeat the test and see what difference it makes.

  19. #14
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    Excellent work that man. So just to be sure: you stuffed the socks in the gap between the fairings and the clutch housing (where the clutch cable exits)?
    Waiting for you to come up with a more permanent solution now

    BTW - that's one spotlessly clean motorcycle you have there

  20. #15
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    The sock is placed between the frame and the black bodywork.....I have enclosed a photo. When I rode without a glove and started feeling around for the source of the heat, it was the gap on the left side. Surprisingly the hot air is not coming out of the vents - even when you shove your hand into the vent from the radiator the air is cooler than what comes out of this gap. When you install the sock you may need to double up the sock at the top to properly fill the gap - make sure you push it all the way up as a lot of heat can come out of even a small gap.

    Last night I realized that if you seldom ride in temperatures over 80, and you never installed a larger windscreen - you likely have never experienced how much heat can come out of this gap. On a 95 degree day with a big windscreen this thing can be a real "testicle toaster"!
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  21. #16
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    I'm thinking some sort of flexible rubber strip stuck to the inside of the panel that makes contact with the frame might be a good fix then.

    I suffered last summer in the south of France with my tall Givi screen in 36C temps (97F). This year in France the temperature touched 36 again but I had the short stock screen and it wasn't as uncomfortable. For the last few days of my trip the temperature in central France was between 15 and low twenties - much more comfortable - even a little on the cold side at times in my summer kit.

  22. #17
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    Is this the 15” windscreen?

  23. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by DJR View Post
    Is this the 15” windscreen?
    The Puig I have on currently is 22" from the bottom to the top. It works great for my 5'-8" height...especially with the Puig deflector on top. The amount of heat was increased dramatically - however the vents I cut has made a big difference and the extra airflow is nice in hot weather.

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    Nope.....not buying any more screens! I have tried the large BMW screen, a couple of National Cycle V-Streams, an Ermax....and now the Puig. The Puig fits my needs best at this point - and with the vents I cut and a Puig deflector I believe it is about as good as it will get (without buying a Madstad). It is now keeping the wind noise from my neck and shoulders, while still providing some good air flow to help me from getting to warm (especially since I added the vents).

    I went for a nice long ride today with the socks in place.....I could tell within a few seconds when one of them slipped down as the amount of heat on my legs increased instantly.

    At the end of the ride it was 86 degrees and I took the socks out and rode for about 20 minutes on back roads to get the temperature stabilized. The left side bodywork was 121 degrees, the right side bodywork was 105, the frame was 107.

    I want to ride on a 90 degree day and take some temperatures before I start to make any modifications. At some point I will take the socks and stuff them into the new windshield vents and see how that affects the heat.

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    I have been using pipe foam insulation for the past 2 summers. Even on the hottest days, there is no difference on the engine temperature gauge with or without foam

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    2010 F800ST

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  28. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Randyjaco View Post
    I have been using pipe foam insulation for the past 2 summers. Even on the hottest days, there is no difference on the engine temperature gauge with or without foam

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    That is interesting.....the ST bodywork is different than the GT.

    All the heat on my GT come from under the frame - not on top. I could not fit anything above the frame......there is a small gap between the bodywork and the bottom of the frame that is the source of the hot air.

    Some black foam pipe insulation might work better than my current old socks!

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    Remember your NT700V? That bike got HOT! Not if you were moving, but if you were sitting in traffic going from one light to another, it was brutal. I had a section of road that I dreaded on a hot summer day. It was the streets leading to the HOV lanes on I5. Tall buildings all around that blocked any breeze, but you were still exposed directly to the hot sun. The metal tank sat directly above the engine...and acted like a heat sink. It was literally painful. And there was no way to get away from it, but to take a different route or walk your bike for many city blocks.

    This is something I did years ago. I blocked the vent with some inner tube rubber. I'm not sure it helps though.

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    I purchased the HWK pants a few months ago. They are a much lighter weight material than the Olympia Dakar pants I like to wear. I don't feel the heat with the Olympia pants. I do with the HWK pants. That material thickness, makes a big difference.

    I've found the heat disappears when the temperature gets above 90F. It isn't that the heat goes away. It is because it is hot all over my body, and I simply put up with it.

    Chris
    Elnathan - 2014 BMW F800GT
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    John 14:6

  30. #24
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    All of the heat on my bike comes from the gap between the frame and the black bodywork that is 4" below that vent. Riding without gloves once the bike warms up and using my fingers to feel the source of the heat was very revealing - I discovered that the vents are spewing very little heat.....it is the gap between the frame and bodywork that keeps my leg toasty! Even something as simple as a sock in that gap reduces the heat drastically (until the sock slips down).

    Last night the wife and I went out to dinner and I took the R1200RT, and the lack of any engine heat was very noticeable as I had ridden the F800GT 120 miles in the same 85 degree weather just a few hours earlier. The exhaust on the R1200RT is in a place that won't ever get to the rider, the cylinders are well shrouded, and they have done a good job routing the radiator air.

    I am going on another ride today and will take some more temperature readings, then tomorrow we are supposed to get up to 90. After tomorrow and a few temperature readings I will start making some changes, as I will have enough readings to be able to tell if my changes are making any improvements. During this ride I will stuff the socks into the new windshield vents and see if the vents I cut into the windscreen are working as well as I think they are.

    I agree with Dalesman, that a little rubber strip that seals up the gap may be all that is needed....I am not sure yet if it is best mounted to the bottom of the frame or to the bodywork. I also will be applying some foil backed self adhesive insulation to the inside of the black body panel.

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    I almost got to 90 today......the temperature bounced between 95-98 depending on where I was and how much paving was around (City was hotter country was coolerO.

    I found out it takes about 20 minutes for the bike to get all warmed up and start putting off heat - the frame takes a long time to get hot. If I could keep a steady pace at 40-50 mph the left side bodywork would be around 114, the right side was around 97, and the frame was around 111.

    At one point in the ride I got into a small town and had to sit at a couple of traffic lights. When I got out of town the left side bodywork was 120, the frame was 118 and the right side was 110. There was a lot of heat coming off the bike while the air began to flow and cool things off.

    I was also able to feel a bit of heat in the vent in in the colored bodywork by my thing - I really couldn't feel any air flow - but the plastic panels were hot and if I stuck my fingers into the vent I could feel that all the plastic was warm.

    Late in the ride I stopped at a gas station and got something to drink. The bike was parked with the right side toward the sun. After I got my drink and came back outside about 10 minutes had passed, and I took a temperature reading. The left side bodywork was 111, the right side bodywork was 140, and the right side frame was 135! Evidently the combination of the sunlight and exhaust heat got the right side cooking.

    When I got back on the highway once again the first few miles were really hot as the bike cooled down from sitting. I got onto a long section of 60mph flat roadway and the air temperature was 88 - the right side bodywork stabilized at 121, the left side frame was 117, the right side bodywork was 101, and the right frame was 111.

    All of the above temperatures were taken without the socks in the bodywork. On the last part of the ride I stuffed the socks into the windscreen vents I had cut last week. Blocking the new windscreen vents did not seem to affect the temperatures at my legs - but blocking off the vents did cut back on the airflow to my torso and the ride felt a little bit hotter.

    I have discovered that the temperatures during a ride vary considerably with a change in speed, wind direction and air temperature. Traffic lights and slow speeds that don't provide a good flow of cooling air can cause the temperatures to go up about 10 degrees on the bodywork.....and also the air that is blowing out on your leg. A increase from 110 degrees to 120 degrees makes a big difference in the way it feels.

    I believe I have done enough data collecting - now it is time to do some fiddling to see if I can make this better!

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  34. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thumpin View Post
    That is interesting.....the ST bodywork is different than the GT.

    All the heat on my GT come from under the frame - not on top. I could not fit anything above the frame......there is a small gap between the bodywork and the bottom of the frame that is the source of the hot air.

    Some black foam pipe insulation might work better than my current old socks!
    Heat comes from both top and bottom on the ST, but the greater amount of heat comes from the top. The pipe foam works great. It is cheap and you can put it on under the body pannels and then tighten the panels in place without damaging the pannels. Of course the color avilability is limited 8^)
    2010 F800ST

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    On my bike, the majority of the heat that affects me, comes from the aluminum frame. If some holes could be judiciously drilled in the frame and properly ducted, I believe that most of the heat complaints could be eliminated.
    2010 F800ST

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    I am trying very hard not to buy these Sasaki frame guards. They are made to order from Carbon Fiber in 2-3 weeks - that is likely about how long I would have to work to get enough money to pay for them!

    https://japan.webike.net/products/20861433.html

    It is a shame somebody doesn't make a cheaper version.

    In post #19 of this thread you can see that they fit the GT. The fellow that installed them said they have insulation and they solved the hot frame issue.
    https://f800riders.org/forum/showthr...-air-on-thighs

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    Those sure look like they would do the job, but the price is way too steep.
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    Hi Everyone,

    Im the guy with the Sasaki Carbon Frame bits. You can see my old post via the link in Thumpin's post.

    This was a show-stopper for me - I had already gotten burns on my inner leg - Australian summers!!! So I did fork out the money for the frame covers.

    I was so desperate that I had actually covered the frames and filled the thin gap (also discussed above) with self-adhesive foam insulation for hot water pipes. This fixed the leg burning issue immediately, but just looked awful on the frame.

    SO I knew I could fix my burn problems with the carbon frame covers. The Sasaki unit fitted perfectly and to be honest, it makes the bike look absolutely amazing. I had guys asking me at the Phillip Island MotoGP if I had a carbon frame.

    So, yes - too much money. But I would have sold the bike if I hadn't got a fix. That would have broken my heart, as I just love the BMW F800GT. I am only 5'7". I do have a slightly narrow pelvis and hips. The bike fits me like a glove and we all know it handles, stops brilliantly and even goes ok ( mine has Power Commander chip and Dyno-tuned so no flat spots, just strong smooth pulling curve and an extra 7hp roughly at rear wheel according to Dyno maps). I ordered directly from Japan and it was about $700 AUD at the time.
    PS - Sorry images need rotating but running late for work
    Cheers, Mike C

  39. #31
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    I'm so glad so folks are addressing the heat issue. Riding in 90deg+ heat is just brutal. I too find that the frame seems to be the major culprit when searing my legs. Definitely looking at those covers for myself. Isn't everything for this bike ~$500?

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    Quote Originally Posted by theSpeedRacerX View Post
    I'm so glad so folks are addressing the heat issue. Riding in 90deg+ heat is just brutal. I too find that the frame seems to be the major culprit when searing my legs. Definitely looking at those covers for myself. Isn't everything for this bike ~$500?
    I wonder if we could get a discount for a "Group Buy" ? They are made to order and it might be more efficient for them if they were building multiple sets?

    Yesterday I rode 9 miles to the gas station and 9 miles back in 93 degree temperatures. When I got back the left side body cover was 125 degrees, the right side was 111, and the frame was 120 degrees!

  41. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thumpin View Post
    I wonder if we could get a discount for a "Group Buy" ? They are made to order and it might be more efficient for them if they were building multiple sets?
    Had the exact same thought. I'd be onboard.

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    Quote Originally Posted by theSpeedRacerX View Post
    I'm so glad so folks are addressing the heat issue. Riding in 90deg+ heat is just brutal. I too find that the frame seems to be the major culprit when searing my legs. Definitely looking at those covers for myself. Isn't everything for this bike ~$500?
    I found a way to put prices in perspective. I spent an obscene amount of money for a "smart" phone. If the covers are roughly half the cost of the phone....?

    Chris
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    IBA# 49894 True Rounder = 0-20's - Rounder -- to -- 100's+ Red Hot Rounder

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  44. #35
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    I'd be in for a group buy if the price got down to @50%
    2010 F800ST

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    I will contact Sasaki and see what could happen if we bought multiple pairs.

    I opened up the new vents in the windscreen a little bigger. These vents help a great deal in keeping the heat away from the upper body - they don't seem to help a great deal with the amount of heat down by your thighs when it gets really hot outside. The vent don't seem to have any affect on the strength or flexibility of the windscreen - it is stable in clean air and wiggles a bit when you are behind a car or truck.....same as before the vents were cut. I think it is important to keep the vents cut low - the air has not yet started to flow along the windscreen surface and more air will be flowing through the vents than would occur if the vents were up higher. When I cut another one I will likely have them a bit more centered between the mounting screws and perhaps follow the contours of the dash a bit more closely (the bottom of these vents followed the contours molded into the windscreen by Puig).

    I did a bit of looking around at the bodywork down where the air enters the radiator. The bodywork is not symmetrical, and the radiator inlet is offset a bit toward the left side. The deflector on the right has a slight curve toward the center and it directs the air into the radiator grill which is offset by the inlet/outlet pipes. The left side is straighter and has a larger area for the air to enter........this may be part of why we get more heat on the left side - it appears more air enters this side, and it also appears the exit down by your ankles is more restricted on the left side (which causes more heat to come out the gap at the frame).
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thumpin View Post
    I will contact Sasaki and see what could happen if we bought multiple pairs.

    I opened up the new vents in the windscreen a little bigger.
    Thanks for reaching out to Sasaki Thumpin. I'm the 3rd owner of my F800GT and a previous owner put a Madstad windscreen on it. It is raised from the mounting point to allow air to come in. It also has the ability to be raised, lowered and angled to some degree. I think you are attempting to do what they did which is smart

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    Well I have heard that: "Anything worth doing is worth overdoing!". I am not sure that applies here - but I did get some work done today and I was able to test the results.

    I bought some heat shield from DE Engineering. It appears to be enough to do 2 bikes: https://www.amazon.com/Design-Engine...01530774&psc=1

    I cleaned the back side of the bodywork and then began making cardboard patterns and sticking the stuff on. I cut the edges of the heat shield just a little bit back from the edge and sealed the joints with the silver tape used on heating ducts (the real duct tape). I applied it everywhere I though the engine was going to send radiant heat to the bodywork.

    I then attempted to apply 2 sided mounting tape to the bottom of the frame and attach a rubber strip to seal the joint - however at the upper part of the frame the rubber just hung out and didn't seal anything. The cure was to mount the rubber strip to the bodywork using the 2 sided mounting tape and then I applied some of the aluminum duct tape on top. I used rubber carpet runner from Lowe's.

    I put everything together and went for a ride....I only did the right side so I could see if it made a difference. It was 80 degrees and my first ride with the infrared temperature gun was within a degree of what today is - on that test ride I got 119 degrees on the left side bodywork and 102 on the right side bodywork....the frame was 112. On that ride I discovered that making a sustained 60 mph ride resulted in the left side dropping to 116 - but the right side dropped to 93! It appears the sustained wind at 60mph cools the right side considerably. On this ride I went for about 25 minutes before I took any temperature readings - but I could tell there was a major change. The left side bodywork was 97.1 degrees, the right side bodywork was 97.2, and the frame was 107. On this ride the right side bodywork was 22 degrees cooler, the right side was 5 degrees cooler, and the frame was also 5 degrees cooler (this would indicate the 22 degree temperature drop should likely should be dropped to 17 to account for the 5 degree cooler temperatures on the right side bodywork and frame). Even more important was the rubber seal was keeping all the hot air from blowing onto my leg and thigh! On the way home I was going a steady 60 mph....the left side bodywork temperature increased to 98 degrees, and like the week before the right side dropped to 89 degrees, and the frame was 109. (As happened before it appears steady cruising at 60 mph doesn't have much affect on the left side - but cools the right side considerably.

    I consider the test a success and will do the right side next - the time and money appear to have been well spent. The amount of heat reduction is significant-you can still feel a bit of radiant heat still coming from the hot frame - but the cooler bodywork and lack of hot air blowing on my leg made a big difference. Time will tell if the rubber and tape are durable.....I think that some foam weatherstripping may be a better solution for the gap between the frame and bodywork.
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  49. #39
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    Would you not get the same effect by sealing this gap?

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