More input about engine heat - BMW F800 Riders Forum & Registry



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  1. #1
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    New to the F800 GT Im still mystified about the inner thigh heat. I find it disturbing and unpleasant.

    I have looked at lots of threads on the issue. In my case, I installed the Sasaki add on heat guards with maybe 50% success.

    I lined the plastic parts with several layers of heat shield fabric. I did not cover the vent openings, though the heat seems to emanate directly from the frame itself.


    Has anyone tried, or had success, with wrapping the exhaust?

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  3. #2
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    There was one forum member who stated he was going to heat wrap his exhaust - he never followed up to let us know if it worked. I have been reluctant to wrap the exhaust - as it appears to be a modification that can be very hard on the exhaust system. Once wrapped the header pipes dissipate less heat, and therefore they get much hotter beneath the heat wrap. Under hard engine use the pipes can get extremely hot and suffer thermal stress........the pipes can suffer deformation and cracks.

    I have considered Ceramic Coating (Jet-Hot and similar products) - these companies coat the inside and outside of the pipe and it reduces the amount of heat. The problem is that they cannot coat the inside of an exhaust that has a catalytic convertor.

    The Sasaki add on heat guards you installed - was that the $500 a pair Carbon Fiber frame covers?

    I posted a thread on "Beat the Heat" and documented what I have done so far, and I have been riding all week in the Ozark Mountains and the bike has been great and really enjoyable to ride. The temperatures have been cool and the only time I noticed any hint of heat was when the air temperatures got over 75.......and then it was not at all objectionable.

    The foam I installed between the black bodywork and the frame is working really well to block the flow of hot air - I have not blocked any vents and they really don't seem to blow hot air. The frame radiating heat really seems to be the problem when air temperatures get up to 80-90 degrees.

  4. #3
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    Yes i did spend for these i really want to cure this issue. Where exactly did you install the foam? And what was it specifically?

    Thanks for any and all input

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  6. #4
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    Here is a link to the thread I started:
    https://f800riders.org/forum/showthr...-Beat-the-Heat!

    The foam I used was the closed cell foam weather stripping that you can buy at hardware stores. I ended up using two different thicknesses stuck together to come up with the correct size to fill the gap.

    The riding I have been doing the last few days in Arkansas has been on rural roads with light traffic, and most of the time we are cruising at 40-60 mph with very few stops. Yesterday the temperature got up to around 75, and on this trip we had to go through several towns with traffic lights and a considerable amount of traffic. The "change" in the amount of heat coming from the frame caused by the frequent stops was very noticeable. Once we got out of traffic and were back up to speed the increase in heat was significant and it took several minutes of riding for the heat to subside. This was the first time I have ridden in town since making the changes, and it appears that riding in town significantly increases the amount of heat radiating from the frame.......most of my riding is done in rural areas and I seldom ride through large towns/cities with more than a few intersections. (NOTE: Today the temperature forecast is for 80 degrees and this is the warmest air temperature of the week......I am curious to see if the amount of heat coming from the engine increases - so far on this trip it has never been warm enough to be bothersome at all).

  7. #5
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    I will try to fill the lower left gap and see what results ensue. It seem to me that a lot of the the originates from the frame itself.

    I also wrapped the radiator hoses with heat shield-its hard to tell yet whether than was beneficial.

    Overall what thickness did you put into the left lower gap, and was it secured in any way?

  8. #6
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    I bought the wrap but never used it. I understand your concern with the heat, not too bad below 90 but above 90 at interstate speeds was not fun. Out west with 80 mph speed limits, going uphill at the speed limit into a head wind was HOT.

    Wraping the exhaust: Never did it as didn't want to create a warranty issue and didn't have the bike that long after the warranty expired. Wrap will cause the back of the exhaust to run hotter as heat that would be lost in the wrapped section will be reduced and other parts will be hotter but I don't think it will be that bad.

    However I do not believe the heat source is the exhaust but rather the radiator. Air flows across the radiator and some escapes out thru the gaps in the fairing and frame. My first step would be to seal off everything and stop the airflow out of the gaps in the frame and the fairing. As I recall looking at the back side of the radiator the openings are there for the air to go out lower. A windscreen and the front of the fairing create a pocket or vacuum which will tend to draw the airflow upwards and the gaps and vents neat the riders thighs are prime areas for the air to go. Based on my experience with very low coolant in the radiator, it has lot of cooling capacity and do not think blocking the vents and gaps will be an issue. Easy enough to test with some duct tape and a test ride.

    My current bike has absolutely no heat issues other than sitting at a traffic light and having the fan come on but that is every bike I think. Last June rode an entire afternoon across Kansas in 105F temperatures. Cannot imagine how that would have been on the F800GT but I did ride it in temperatures up to 103F in Alabama. I sweated!

  9. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thumpin View Post
    ...The "change" in the amount of heat coming from the frame caused by the frequent stops was very noticeable. Once we got out of traffic and were back up to speed the increase in heat was significant and it took several minutes of riding for the heat to subside. This was the first time I have ridden in town since making the changes, and it appears that riding in town significantly increases the amount of heat radiating from the frame...
    There's nothing strange about that scenario. I had a Honda NT700V and that metal gas tank used to get scorching hot. My only hope when sitting in a string of traffic lights, was the open freeway and the cooling air that would bring. After a couple minutes, the heat dissipated. It's the same scenario, but a different portion of the bike that gets hot.

    Quote Originally Posted by PhotoAl View Post
    ...I understand your concern with the heat, not too bad below 90 but above 90 at interstate speeds was not fun. Out west with 80 mph speed limits, going uphill at the speed limit into a head wind was HOT...

    My current bike has absolutely no heat issues other than sitting at a traffic light and having the fan come on but that is every bike I think. Last June rode an entire afternoon across Kansas in 105F temperatures. Cannot imagine how that would have been on the F800GT but I did ride it in temperatures up to 103F in Alabama. I sweated!
    I've only had my GT up into triple digits a couple times, but at 90 mph, it hasn't been bad at all. Plenty of airflow to keep the heat down.

    I was riding home from South Dakota last summer and the temperature in Kamiah, ID was 117F in the shade. I never noticed the heat from the bike.

    What I want to know, is how can I get this heat for the next six months?

    BTW, comparing your current bike to the GT, is like comparing apples to oranges. Your current bike has very little for a fairing, and the engine is completely open to dissipate the heat.

    Chris
    Elnathan - 2014 BMW F800GT
    IBA# 49894 True Rounder = 0-20's - Rounder -- to -- 100's+ Red Hot Rounder

    John 14:6 

  10. #8
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    Your bike and the little heat makes me think there is something to the fit of the fairings and plastic pieces inside them that fixes the problems. Makes me really curious about the differences between your bike and my old bike. Probably due to the fact that you are tough and I'm weak

    My Tracer does have less fairings particularly down low but they do a good job of keeping wind off.

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  12. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thumpin View Post
    There was one forum member who stated he was going to heat wrap his exhaust - he never followed up to let us know if it worked. I have been reluctant to wrap the exhaust - as it appears to be a modification that can be very hard on the exhaust system. Once wrapped the header pipes dissipate less heat, and therefore they get much hotter beneath the heat wrap. Under hard engine use the pipes can get extremely hot and suffer thermal stress........the pipes can suffer deformation and cracks.
    I wrapped the exhaust on my 2007 ST. Also got the plastic duct that fits underneath the left fairing panel to channel heat out the fairing vent. Not a significant change to the engine/radiator/frame heat. It’s a Delkevic slip on, I have not noticed excess heat at the silencer. I’ve ridden in high 90s here in PA all summer, mechanically everything is AOK.

    My first two bikes were an MZ Skorpion and a Suzuki V Strom, neither with the fairing coverage that my ST has. I may just be overly sensitive to it. Still love the bike and am currently stripping a spare engine to do a full refresh for some future swap.

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